Rheumatologic Diseases Can Initially Present Like Neurological Disorders

Research appearing in the Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports have shown that lupus and other rheumatologic disorders can initially present as neurological disorders such as headaches and seizures which can lead to a few months of a delay in proper diagnosis. Rheumatologic diseases include autoimmune and inflammatory disorders of the joints and soft tissues, such as systemic vasculitis, lupus, and ankylosing spondylosis. More than half of lupus patients have headaches and a third have migraines. Around 1.5% of lupus patients have a headache that is persistent, severe, and intractable and does not respond to narcotic medications. Up to 20% of lupus patients have seizures and 1/3 of lupus patients have cognitive dysfunction. Up to 20% of lupus patients experience mood disorders such as psychosis. Patients who have systemic vasculitis can have headaches, stroke like syndromes, seizures, and optic neuropathies. Around 1/3 of systemic vasculitis patients have residual neurological impairments and need treatment to suppress their immune systems. Patients who have ankylosing spondylosis can experience seizures, cranial neuropathy, cognitive impairments, and headaches. There are different treatment options for patients for rheumatic disorders. Medications can include immune-suppressing drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is noted however that some medications can have neurological effects as a risk. […]

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Proper Dental Care Can Lead to Less Respiratory Infections in the ICU

A study appearing in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology suggests that proper dental care can lead to less respiratory infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital. The study was conducted by Brazilian researchers who used an observer-blind randomized clinical trial to analyze data from 254 patients who stayed in a ICU for at least 48 hours. The patients were randomized to receive enhanced dental care by a dentist or to receive standard oral hygiene by a nurse. Enhanced dental care included teeth brushing, tongue scraping, atraumatic restorative treatment, removal of calculus, extraction of teeth, and topical application of chlorhexidine 4 to 5 times a week. Regular dental care consisted of mechanical cleansing using gauze which was followed by chlorhexidine 3 times a week. The patients who received enchanced dental care were 56% less likely to develop a respiratory tract infection during their ICU stay when compared to the patient control group. The researchers feel that enchanced dental treatment routinely performed in ICUs can help in reducing oral bacteria and help prevent respiratory tract infections like ventilator associated pneumonia. This study shows that bacteria causing infections can often start in the mouth or oral cavity. Source: Wanessa T. Bellissimo-Rodrigues […]

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Is Not Removing Wisdom Teeth Causing Harm?

An interesting article titled “Is official advice about NOT pulling out wisdom teeth doing more harm than good?” appeared earlier this year in February 2015, on the DailyMail over at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2946498/Is-NHS-causing-agony-telling-dentists-not-pull-wisdom-teeth.html and written by Cara Lee. The article questions whether or not the year 2000 guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) went too far with preventing wisdom teeth extractions in teenagers and young adults. In these guidelines NICE said that the practice of prophylactic removal of pathology-free impacted third molars should be discontinued in the National Health Service in the U.K. Hence only wisdom teeth with problems should be extracted. In the article on the DailyMail there is a discussion of a 31 year old male who never had wisdom teeth extracted in his teens. Now he needs his wisdom teeth extracted and the molars next to his wisdom teeth possibly extracted due to decay and cavities. There is also a discussion of a 24 year old female who never had her wisdom teeth extracted in her teens. Now she has been experiencing intense intermittent pain in her lower jaw. Sometimes she had difficulty eating and the pain woke her up from sleeping. This will […]

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Seventeen Year Old Minnesota Teen Dies After Wisdom Teeth Extraction

A few weeks ago in June, 2015, a 17 year old Minnesota woman died about a week after having wisdom teeth surgery. Near the end of the wisdom teeth surgery her blood pressure increased, her pulse dropped, and she went into cardiac arrest. She then was transferred to a hospital and suffered from seizures and swelling in her brain until passing about a week later. It is not clear what caused the death to occur. She could have possibly had an undisclosed heart condition that has occurred in other cases. It is possible for a patient to only become aware of an asymptomatic and abnormal heart rhythm once they come in for a surgery. I have discussed other deaths from wisdom teeth removal on this website (see http://www.teethremoval.com/death.html). Based on numerous studies and publications I have said that around 1 death occurs in every 400,000 from wisdom teeth surgery (see http://www.teethremoval.com/mortality_rates_in_dentistry.html). For some additional cases where a teenager died after wisdom teeth surgery in the United States of America see for example http://blog.teethremoval.com/flesh-eating-bacteria-leads-to-death-after-wisdom-teeth-removal/ and http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-removal-leaves-to-death-two-days-after/. Source: Elizabeth Narins. 17-Year-Old Girl Dies After Getting Her Wisdom Teeth Removed. June 16, 2015. http://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/news/a41983/17-year-old-girl-dies-after-getting-her-wisdom-teeth-removed/. Accessed July 4, 2015.

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Using Ozone Nano Bubble Water to Treat Gum Infections

Ozone nano-bubble water is a new antiseptic agent that may potentially be used to treat periodontitis or severe gum infections. Researchers at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University published their research in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The researchers evaluated the bactericidal activities of ozone nano-bubble water (known as NBW3) against two bacterial agents that cause periodontitis. The research results showed that NBW3 can kill periodontal pathogens within 30 seconds of exposure with only a minor impact on the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 hours of exposure. Based on the in vitro results, the researchers concluded that NBW3 could become a potential way to treat periodontitis. Even so in vitro models can not be used directly to compare clinical situations When treating periodontitis (which is inflammation of oral tissues that surround and support teeth) the first step involves mechanical debridement (scraping away of dental plaque and dental calculus). Different antiseptics and antibiotics have been used to supplement mechanical debridement. Antibiotic therapies have drawbacks such as the selectivity of antimicrobial action, risk for adverse host reactions, and possible development of resistant bacteria. A possible alternative is ozone which has strong antimicrobial activity against fungi, bacteria, protozoa, […]

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