Archive | June, 2014

Does Flouride Cause Additional Hip Fractures?

Researchers are interested in studying fluoride and it’s possible benefits and risks due to it commonly being in water supplies of communities. This is because fluoride is known to help prevent cavities. Even so, some question if putting fluoride in everyone’s water is the right thing to do as some people could experience problems from the water. For example, several studies have shown Large Amounts of Fluoride Consumed by Young Children Leads to Fluorosis. Hence, it is beneficial to minimize fluoride exposure to young children. Others have looked at the opposite end of the age spectrum: old people. Researchers in Sweden have investigated the possibility that fluoride in the water can lead to additional hip fractures. The study consisted of a large amount of Swedish residents who were exposured to fluoride levels with the researchers testing a hypothesis that there is an association between fluoride level in drinking water and the risk of hip fracture. The study appeared in the Journal of Dental Research. The researchers included all of those born in Sweden between January 1, 1900 and December 31, 1919, who were currently still alive and living in their municipality of birth. A total of 473,277 participants were used and their information was […]

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Flesh Eating Bacteria Leads to Death After Wisdom Teeth Removal

Earlier this year (2014) in February, I posted about an Eighteen Year Old Music Student in Portland Dies After Wisdom Teeth Removal. This occurred in Maine. It has been since confirmed by a medical examiner, that the 18 year old man died after his wisdom teeth extraction by developing necrotizing fasciitis. This is a flesh eating bacteria which can ravage muscles and skin tissue. A quote is provided (see source below)  by the infection control expert from the American Dental Association who says he has never heard of necrotizing fasciitis after wisdom teeth extractions. I am not quite sure why he says this as cases have appeared of this in the literature and I have discussed this on the wisdom teeth complications page over at http://www.teethremoval.com/complications.html. Another case of death occurring from necrotizing fasciitis after wisdom teeth extraction occurred to a 25 year old man in 2007, in Seattle, Washington. See Carol Smith. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Enough Scrutiny in Dental Deaths? July 15, 2008. http://www.seattlepi.com/local/370740_dentists15.html. In this case it took 3 days after the wisdom teeth extraction until death. This was also the number of days before death in the case in Maine for the 18 year old male. Source: Tomas Jivanda, […]

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Cut Sugar to Prevent Cavities

If you are looking to avoid cavities in your teeth and wisdom teeth, then you may want to consider limiting your intake of sugar. Free sugars are added to many foods and are naturally present in other food such as honey and fruit juice. Since 1990, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said they suggest less than 10% of all calorie intake should be from free sugars. A study conducted by Newcastle University and commissioned by the WHO and was published last year in the Journal of Dental Research explored free sugar intake as a percentage of calorie intake and the incidence of dental cavities. The article found when less than 10% of total calories in the diet is from free sugars there are much lower levels of cavities (tooth decay). The article also found that when less than 5% of total calories is from free sugars even further benefits are found which reduces the risk of dental cavities over a lifetime. Hence if one is expecting to keep their teeth throughout their lifetime and wants to minimize the risk of dental cavities they should modify what they eat and drink to limit sugars. The researchers from Newcastle explored 55 […]

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Chewing Gum Linked to Headaches

An interesting study and findings regarding a link between headaches and gum chewing has come from Tel Aviv University. The article was published in Pediatric Neurology and looked at 30 patients between 6 and 19 with chronic headache and who were big gum chewers. The patients were told to stop chewing gum. After 1 month, nineteen of the patients had their headache go away and 7 additional patients in the group had a decrease in the severity and frequency of their headaches. Twenty six of the patients were then told to go back to chewing gum like they used to and they all said their previous symptoms returned within days. The researchers speculate that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction may be the likely trigger at bay. The researchers believe that TMJ overuse is causing the headaches. Other possibilities were suggested such as aspartame commonly found in chewing gum but many other products contain aspartame and don’t have a clear link with headaches. The researchers believe that if teenagers are suffering from chronic headaches and chew gum a lot, they should stop chewing gum and see if their symptoms resolve. This way expensive tests and other treatments can first be avoided. Other triggers for headaches include […]

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Dental Anxiety Associates with Pain During Dental Procedures

It is well known by dentists that some patients experience dental anxiety, with some patients have worse dental anxiety than others. In a review article titled “Dental Anxiety Is Considerably Associated With Pain Experience During Dental Procedures,” by Mike T. John, appearing in J Evid Base Dent Pract, 2013, issue 13, pp. 29-30, the issue of dental anxiety in dental patients is explored. The study reviews a study titled “Predictors of pain associated with routine procedures performed in general dental practice,” by Tickle M, Milsom K, Crawford FI, and Aggarwal VR, in Community Dent Oral Epidemiol, 2012 Aug;40(4):343-50. In the original study 508 patients who visit 38 different dentists in England participate. Dental anxiety was measured with the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale which resulted in a score between 4 and 20. This score was grouped into 4 different variables representing anxiety. The dental patients were asked to rate their intensity of pain on a scale of 0 to 10 during the procedure, after the procedure, and later after the procedure (not immediate). The researchers performed logistic regression and found that very anxious patients had a fivefold increased odds of experiencing pain during the dental procedure compared to patients who had […]

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