Archive | March, 2016

Should a Dentist Work While They are Sick?

An interesting article titled “Ethical concerns of working while ill,” appears in the Sept. 2015, issue of JADA (vol. 146, no. 9, pp. 711-712). The article talks about a dentist who over a period of a few days got progressively sicker. The article questions whether or not he should work or take time off until he gets over the illness. The article discusses a NSF International survey of workers that says 26% of all workers go into work when sick. The article says that 42% of Americans  work while sick. The article states that dentists have an obligation to do no harm to their patients. If they report to work while sick and are treating older patients who have increased risk of getting pulmonary illness this can be a problem. The article states that dentists also need to provide a certain standard of care of treatment. If they are sick the quality of their work may be worse and thus they won’t provide care to the proper standard. If a dentist reports to work while sick they may also get their staff members sick. This can cause a cascade affect in their dental practice. The article states “As a practical matter, […]

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How to treat your wisdom teeth during pregnancy

It is completely safe to have regular dental cleanings while you are pregnant. Many women experience pregnancy-related gingivitis and other dental issues during pregnancy, and regular cleaning may help minimize the chances of developing a serious problem. However, we can’t always predict what will happen, and sometimes serious problems arise that need to be addressed. The topic of dental treatments during pregnancy is one that gets a lot of attention, and the information can be confusing. One issue that is particularly controversial is the issue of treating wisdom teeth. What can you do if you experience pain and swelling related to your wisdom teeth during pregnancy? Is it safe to treat them, or do you have to endure the pain until after you have your baby? The bottom line is that you should schedule an appointment with your dentist immediately if you experience wisdom tooth pain while pregnant. Problems Caused by Wisdom Teeth To understand why it is important to see your dentist for wisdom tooth pain, let’s talk about some of the things that can happen if you ignore it: Swelling and pain in the gums can be fairly common during pregnancy. When wisdom teeth cause pain, even routine […]

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Painkiller Overdose in Michigan: Are Wisdom Teeth Extractions Contributing?

Before on this blog I have talked about how oral surgeons prescribe powerful painkillers for use after wisdom teeth removal. It is possible some of these painkillers are instead used for non-medical use. See the posts http://blog.teethremoval.com/comparing-narcotic-prescribing-habits-for-oral-surgeons-in-the-u-s-and-canada/ and http://blog.teethremoval.com/do-oral-surgeons-prescribe-too-many-narcotics-for-use-after-wisdom-teeth-removal/. An interesting article titled “Synder officials take on painkiller overdose ‘epidemic’” located at  http://www.detroitnews.com/story/life/wellness/2015/10/12/prescriptions/73798342/ and written by Gary Heinlein and Joel Kurth, discusses a surge in overdose deaths in Michigan linked to the abuse of pain and anxiety medications (Oct. 12, 2015). One of the cases describe how a man’s addiction to painkillers was aided by a 30-day prescription for Vicodin after his wisdom teeth extraction. The article states “The state’s health department has said overdose deaths linked to opioids were increasing at a faster rate than for illegal drugs such as heroin — also on the rise — and cocaine. A state report also noted that another class of medications called benzodiazepines — prescribed for anxiety — accounted for about 9 percent of deaths.” The governor of Michigan Rick Snyder has created a task force to explore the issue of painkiller overdose deaths. The drugs included those such as fentanyl, codeine and hydrocodone, or brand names such as OxyContin, Demerol and Vicodin. The article later says “According […]

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Experts Insist Flossing Does Nothing to Limit Tooth Decay…Could They Be Correct?

When it comes to orthodontics health and habits, it always seems that someone is telling us what we can and cannot do. Perhaps that is why those studies that make us feel better about not always following the rules makes us feel better. Findings published for the past decade about the effectiveness of flossing on tooth decay has been mixed. Some studies have found that it has no relation to tooth decay while others insist that tooth health is directly related to nothing more than flossing. There seems to be some truth to the scientific findings that the shame we all get by our dental hygienist may not be well founded. Could it be that we need not feel ashamed that flossing is not on our lists of to-dos? The research shows that if you don’t make a daily routine out of flossing, you may not be alone. A reported ten to forty percent of Americans are the only ones who take to their teeth with the thin line of string as recommended. What about the other sixty to ninety percent? Could they know something that those who hold fast to good habits don’t? Could it be possible that flossing […]

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A new marker in blood for migraine?

An interesting article titled “Interictal, circulating sphingolipids in women with episodic migraine: A case-control study” written by B. L. Peterlin and et al. discusses that a new marker in blood may have been found for episodic migraine (Neurology, 2015). Episodic migraine is when a patient has less than 15 headaches per month. The researchers performed a study with 52 women with episodic migraine and 36 women who did not have any headaches. They all had to undergo a neurologic exam, gave blood samples, and had their body mass index measured. The women in the study with migraine had an average of 5.6 headache days per month. The blood samples were tested for a group of lipids that are known to help regulate inflammation in the brain and participate in energy homeostasis. The study found the total levels of lipids called ceramides were decreased in women with episodic migraine when compared to women with no migraines. It was found that women with migraine had approximately 6,000 nanograms per milliliter of total ceramides in their blood and women without headache had about 10,500 nanograms per milliliter. Each standard deviation increase in ceramide levels was found to be associated with over a 92% lower risk of having episodic migraine. The researchers […]

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