Archive | May, 2016

Complications Associated with Coronectomy

An interesting article titled “What Are the Types and Frequencies of Complications Associated With Mandibular Third Molar Coronectomy? A Follow-Up Study,” appears in the 2015 Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol. 73, pp. 1246-1253) and written by Giuseppe Monaco. The article explores the likelyhood of complications occuring with coronectomy procedures. Coronectomy is an alternative surgical procedure to extract wisdom teeth with roots that are close to the mandibular canal. The article describes a research study  to determine whether coronectomy decreased neurologic damage in cases of mandibular third molars in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve. The study looked at 94 healthy patients with a mean age of ~30 who had 116 mandibular third molars (wisdom teeth) treated with coronectomy. A total of 28 patients dropped out of the study during the 3 year follow up period. Of the 116 wisdom teeth treated, 56 (48.3%) were totally impacted and 60 (51.7%) were partially impacted. The teeth were treated by coronectomy due to having pericoronitis (47.4%), periodontal disease (18.1%), or both of the mentioned diseases (32.9%). No neurological injuries occurred to the inferior alveolar nerve or to the lingual nerve with the coronectomy procedures. A total of 30 complications occurred […]

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Reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

An interesting article titled “Reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in the UK:the patients’ perspective,” appears in the 2015 British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol. 53, pp. 321–325) and written by M. Abu -Serriah and et al. The article seeks to explore the reputation of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS). The authors state “One of these is the fact that professional reputations are gifted by salient stakeholders rather than being controlled directly by the professionals themselves, and an important group of stakeholders that has been reported (in publications on professions in medicine) to cause feelings of deprofessionalisation is made up of patients.” In the U.K. the OMFS has shifted to a medical base. OMFS overlaps with other surgical specialties, such as plastic surgery, ear, nose, and throat (ENT), and dentistry. Patients and the public can be confused by the inconsistent use of names, since OMFS is sometimes referred to as oral surgery, oral and facial surgery, and oral and craniomaxillo-facial surgery. The authors conducted focus groups of 5 to 10 patients and lasting no more than 90 minutes to gain insights into their perception of OMFS. A total of 17 patients participated in such focus groups. Some things pointed out in the […]

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Anxiety in Dental Patients Before and After Tooth Extraction

An interesting article titled “Assessment of general pre and post operative anxiety in patients undergoing tooth extraction a prospective study,” appears in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and written by Pia López-Jornet and et al. (vol. 52, pp. 18-23, 2014). The article sought to explore the amount of anxiety and fear before, immediately after, and one week after dental extraction. The researchers included 70 patients in their study. It is known that fear and anxiety in dentistry is usually associated with poor oral health and poor oral health related quality of life. Some studies have shown that those with lower socioeconomic status and with less education have more anxiety but others have shown those with more education have more anxiety. The researchers believe that oral surgery is stressful for patients and that anxiety fluctuates over time. They feel dental anxiety can be assessed with self-reported scales including the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventor (STAI), the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS), and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The patients included in the study were healthy, with no serious medical conditions or blood dyscrasias. Patients who presented with acute infections were excluded, as well as those with psycho-organic or behavioural disorders, or those with language or cognitive problems. The teeth were extracted under normal conditions (local […]

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Exploring Antibiotic Use with Lower Wisdom Teeth Surgery

An interesting article titled “Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with post operative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery” appears in the 2014 British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and written by J. Y. Lee and et al. (vol. 52, pp. 54-57). The article set out to investigate the correlation between antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications of lower wisdom teeth. The authors say that indiscriminate antibiotic prophylaxis can lead to antimicrobial resistance and a shift in the microbial population. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of extraction of lower wisdom teeth performed at Korea University Guro Hospital over a two year time frame starting in January 2010. The authors only included cases in which cefditoren pivoxil was prescribed as an antibiotic. In addition, patients that were kept in a hospital due to postoperative complications were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into two groups those given antibiotics and those not given antibiotics. A total of 1222 extractions in 890 patients were included in the study. The authors found that overall the difficulty of extraction and post operative complications were significantly associated (p=0.03). In cases grouped by similar class of difficulty, it was found that there was no significant correlation […]

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