Archive | December, 2016

Can Providing Audiovisual Information Help Relieve Anxiety in Patients Having Wisdom Teeth Removed?

An interesting article titled “Effect of Audiovisual Treatment Information on Relieving Anxiety in Patients Undergoing Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal” written by Sung-Hwan Choi and et al. appears in the 2015 Journal and Oral and Maxilofacial Sugery (vol. 73, pp. 2087-2092). The authors set out to explore if providing patients undergoing wisdom teeth removal an audiovisual slide presentation that provided treatment information could improve patient knowledge of postoperative complications and decrease anxiety. It is well known that patients having wisdom teeth surgery can have anxiety due to the needles and drills involved. Studies have shown that a lack of information about surgery and complications can lead to increased anxiety. Typically a written informed consent document is provided to patients prior to surgery. However, it is not clear how well patients can understand this information. The authors of the article designed a study to provide treatment information using an audiovisual slide presentation to help improve patient knowledge of postoperative complications and decrease anxiety before and after the removal of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth. Patients included in the study were between 18 and 27 and treated in Seoul Korea. A total of 51 patients were included in the study who were randomly distributed into two groups. The first group received the Korean Dental Association Informed Consent document with […]

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Take Me Out! A Brief Guide to Tooth Extraction – Infographic

Extraction is usually the agreed upon option for teeth which have become damaged or decayed where they are no longer reparable. Extraction is also worth considering if your mouth is overcrowded or to reduce the risk of infection if your immune system has been compromised from receiving chemotherapy or an organ transplant. Tooth extraction or tooth removal is generally considered safe and any respectable dentist will be able to put the patient at ease prior to surgery. Patients who are especially apprehensive will be given a sedative to ease their nerves before the dentist administers anesthetic to the area surrounding the tooth that will be extracted. The entire procedure is carried out with great care and intricacy by a dental professional who considers the patient’s health a priority, so you can rest assured that the entire operation will be seamless. Prior to tooth extraction, it is important to provide your dentist or oral surgeon with your full health history. You must also abstain from eating, drinking and smoking in the hours leading up to the surgery. Also, be sure to have someone to drive you home afterwards, as you will be unable to drive if given certain types of anaesthetics. To find out […]

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Teeth whitening: Debunking the top myths

Teeth whitening is one of the most mainstream dental procedures around. It has become so mainstream that a lot of options are do it yourself based. While you can find dentists in Ballymena or your wherever you may live, there are other ways in which you can apply an in-home treatment and reap the benefits. Admittedly, the latter isn’t quite as potent and the whiteness might not be as satisfying, but the option does exist. As this is a procedure which has become so popular over recent years, it’s hardly surprising to see that there are umpteen myths and misconceptions that are around. Bearing this in mind, some of the most common myths surrounding teeth whitening are highlighted below. Myth #1 – You can use fruit to whiten your teeth Strawberries and lemons seem to be the most commonly referred to foods to help with teeth whitening. On one hand it’s completely understandable as in some ways, both strawberries and lemons can be used to whiten your teeth. Looking at the situation in the wider picture, it’s not really the case though. These are two foods which contain a considerable amount of acid, which over time will eat away at the enamel […]

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Diabetes and dentistry: Two issues which go hand-in-hand

If you happen to hear a conversation about diabetes – you could be forgiven for not realizing it can have a direct impact on your mouth. Numerous studies have shown that there is a direct link between diabetes and your teeth. This correlation was mentioned in an article by a Dorset dentist which led to further exploration. Here, it was outlined how there are two problems which can occur as a result of diabetes. The topic has been investigated in more detail to put together the following guide. This takes a look at both of the problems which were highlighted in the initial article, before embarking on some top tips to make sure you don’t become part of the unlucky group who is affected. Problem #1 – Periodontal disease Few people will have heard of the condition known as periodontal disease, but if you suffer from diabetes you are very much at risk. People who don’t control their diabetes effectively can experience an increase in the glucose concentrates in their blood. In turn, this can cause tissue in the gums (and various other parts of the body for that matter) to inflame. Over time, this inflammation will result in the gum breaking […]

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Does the Use of Cone Beam CT for Wisdom Teeth Removal Change the Surgical Approach Compared With Panoramic Radiography?

An interesting article titled “Does the Use of Cone Beam CT for the Removal of Wisdom Teeth Change the Surgical Approach Compared With Panoramic Radiography?” appears in the Sept. 2015 Journal of Oral Maxilofacial Surgery supplement (vol. 73, issue 9, pg. e12) written by S.P. Aravindaksha. The present study looked at  if the additional information provided by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images influences the surgical strategy in the treatment of patients with impacted mandibular wisdom teeth in high-risk cases. The study sought to explore if there is any difference in risk assessment for inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) when using CBCT or panoramic radiography. In the study patients with an increased risk of IAN injury, as diagnosed on panoramic radiographs, were enrolled in and underwent additional CBCT imaging. The study consisted of 52 impacted wisdom teeth from 36 patients (20 women and 16 men) with an average age of 24.6 years. Three board certified oral maxillofacial surgeons independently evaluated the panoramic radiographs in randomized order followed by the CBCT images. The surgeons were asked to answer questions based on the images. Some inconsistencies were found across the surgeons for how well CBCT findings matched panoramic radiographic findings. Even so, the […]

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