Archive | Pain

FDA Issues Alert to Prevent Lidocaine 2 Percent Solution to Not be Used for Teething Pain for Children

On June 26, 2014, the FDA issued an alert warning health professionals and providers that “…prescription oral viscous lidocaine 2% solution should not be used to treat infants and children with teething pain.” The FDA says that topical pain relievers and other medications that are rubbed on the gums are not useful for infants because they wash out of the mouth within minutes. Furthermore, when too much viscous lidocaine is given to children and is swallowed it can result in brain injury, seizures, heart problems, and even death. The FDA alert is located over at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm402790.htm. In the background information it states “In 2014, FDA reviewed 22 case reports of serious adverse reactions, including deaths, in infants and young children 5 months to 3.5 years of age who were given oral viscous lidocaine 2 percent solution for the treatment of mouth pain, including teething and stomatitis, or who had accidental ingestions.” The FDA advises that parents should follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations to treat teething pain. This includes used a chilled teething ring and having the parent gently rub or massage the child’s gums. Furthemore, the FDA advises against using any over the counter topical medication to treat teething […]

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How to Manage Pain Patients in Dental Practice

An interesting article appears in J Can Dent Assoc 2012;78:c83 titled “Neuropathic Orofacial Pain Patients in Need of Dental Care,” written by Gary D. Klasser and Henry A. Gremillion. It was posted online on August 17, 2012, over at http://www.jcda.ca/article/c83. The abstract of the article states “Dental pain is a common complaint among the general population. Most pain is a result of traumatic injury or bacterial infection in pulpal and periapical tissues, and dental practitioners are successful at diagnosing these conditions and providing prompt relief. However, in some cases, patients continue to complain of persistent pain, which may be categorized as neuropathic. These people may avoid or neglect routine dental treatment or interventions to prevent precipitation, perpetuation or exacerbation of their pain condition, and practitioners may have to modify their procedures when managing the dental needs of this unique population.” The article mentions that most dental pain is the result of traumatic injury or bacterial infection and classified as nociceptive or inflammatory. A description of the differences between nociceptive and inflammatory pain is provided. The article states that dental practitioners are very succesful at recognizing and treating these types of pain. The article then goes on to say “However, in […]

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Western Dental injuries and pain

I found some interesting pieces from ABC 7 KGO-TV San Francisco, CA. The articles and videos are about the second largest HMO in the state of California called Western Dental. Numerous people are profiled talking about things such as nerve damage following wisdom teeth removal, people’s healthy teeth being pulled out and being replaced with dentures,  a syringe injecting bleech into a girl’s sinus during a root canal, and putting too much filler into the root of a woman’s teeth during a root canal and causing severe pain. Of course Western Dental defends by not admitting wrongdoing but then lawsuits result and a settlement is reached in some cases. In other cases Western Dental has not paid for subsequent follow up treatment. To see the videos and read more of the articles visit these 2 links. http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/iteam&id=7583317 http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/iteam&id=7585208

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Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and It’s Effect on Trigeminal Nerve Cells

Researchers at Oregon Health and Science University’s School of Dentistry have discovered when tissues are inflamed, the nerve cells carrying pain information from the head to the brain produce in large quantities a protein involved in pain signaling. This has implications for the treatments of such conditions as headaches, TMJ, toothache, and craniofacial pain, which is one of the most frequent pain conditions. The trigeminal nerve sends information about pain associated with headaches, head and neck cancer,  TMJ,  periodontal disease, trigeminal neuralgia, dental procedures, and more. Unfortunately the molecular mechanisms of trigeminal pain are not currently well understood and thought to involve inflammation. The researchers have found that the trigeminal nerve cells make a molecule called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This plays an important role in the development and normal functioning of the nervous system. In addition,  stimulation of trigeminal nerve cells, such as with head pain, leads to the release of BDNF. In a separate study it was shown that BDNF is involved in the mechanism of headaches such as migraines.  In the current study, the researchers found that tooth pulp inflammation of as few as two molar teeth leads to a dramatic and widespread increase in BDNF production […]

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Pain, Nerve Blocks, and Prolotherapy

Both videos are by Dr. Marc Darrow. The first video addresses nerve blocks, complications, and how they affect chronic pain. The second video addressing prolotherapy which is the natural ability of the body to produce more collagen. Chronic Pain: Pain Management: Prolotherapy

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