Archive | Wisdom Teeth

Skipping Breakfast Ups Tooth Decay Risk For Children

Caregivers should beware that young children who skip breakfast might be fattening their chances of experiencing tooth decay, according to a study in this month’s Journal of the American Dental Association. Using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, study authors investigated the relationship between healthful eating practices (such as breast-feeding, eating breakfast and consuming five servings of fruits and vegetables a day) and dental caries in the primary teeth among children two to five years old. “Specifically, not eating breakfast every day was found to be associated with overall caries (tooth decay) experience and untreated decay in the primary dentition in children aged two through five years,” the authors wrote. “Our findings support the notion that even if the effects of poverty could be mitigated, healthful eating practices among preschoolers would contribute to further reduction in caries.” Tooth decay more likely for higher-income kids with poor eating habits According to the authors, it is well known that minority children or children identified within lower socioeconomic groups, are more likely to experience caries compared with non-minority children or children in higher socioeconomic groups. However, in their analysis of […]

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Dental Researchers Test No-needle Anesthesia, No-drilling Cavity Care

Imagine having a decayed tooth repaired, painlessly, without drilling or shots of anesthesia to numb the area. Wishful thinking? Not if two studies being conducted at the University at Buffalo’s School of Dental Medicine show positive results. In one study, funded by a $100,000 grant by Apollonia, LLC, researchers in the school’s Center for Dental Studies are testing a nasal spray that numbs the upper teeth. “If this study is successful,” said Sebastian Ciancio, D.D.S., principal investigator on the study, “it may mean the end of dental injections when dentists are performing procedures on the upper arch.” The second study, set to begin in coming months, will test the use of ozone to kill bacteria in a decayed tooth and its potential to eliminate the need for the dreaded drill, at least to repair simple cavities. Researchers at UB and two other U.S. dental schools will conduct the research, which is funded by a $1.5 million grant from Curozone, Inc. and Kavo Dental Manufacturing Co. UB’s portion is $400,000. Ciancio, who also is the UB principal investigator on this study, said the ozone delivery device currently is being used in Europe. “If the U.S. studies are successful, it should be […]

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Improper Consumption Of Acidic Foods Could Lead To Destroyed Enamel

Fruit, yogurt, citric and soft drinks, may seem like harmless snacks and beverages, but improper consumption and overuse may lead to devastating and permanent damage to teeth. It’s known as tooth erosion, the break down of tooth structure caused by the effect of acid on the teeth that leads to decay. According to David Bartlett, BDS, PhD, who will lead a discussion at the Academy of General Dentistry’s 55th annual meeting in San Diego, titled, “Acid Erosion-Why is it Important to My Patients?”, “Early diagnosis and prevention of the effects of tooth erosion are fundamental to keeping teeth healthy for life.” “Sipping or holding acidic drinks in the mouth before swallowing increases the risk of erosion on dental enamel,” says Dr. Bartlett. Dental enamel is the thin, outer layer of hard tissue that helps maintain the tooth’s structure and shape while protecting it from decay. Soft drinks, which contain acids, break the tooth surfaces. These acids also damage tooth enamel over time by dissolving the mineral structure of teeth, thinning the teeth. Eventually, because of repeated exposure to acid, the tooth’s enamel will lose its shape and color and as the damage progresses; the underlying dentin, (which is the tissue […]

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Teen Tooth Trauma Prevalent In Ontario

Nearly one in five Ontario Grade 8 students shows evidence of damage to his or her front teeth, says a new University of Toronto study. This the first study of dental injury done in Ontario, says David Locker, a professor with the U of T Faculty of Dentistry. Similar studies have been done in other countries because tooth trauma is considered one of the most severe conditions children can experience. “Once you break an anterior tooth, you carry that with you for life,” says Locker. “Although it can be treated, there’s a likelihood you’ll need to repeat that treatment every 10 years. The cost of initial treatment can be quite high, depending on the injury, and the lifetime cost is estimated to be as high as $250,000 for four teeth.” Locker and his research team examined a random sample of 14-year-olds in schools served by six Ontario public health departments: Durham region, Halton region, Hamilton, Simcoe County, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph and York region. Overall, 18.5 per cent of the teens almost one in five showed evidence of tooth damage; six per cent exhibited severe damage with teeth broken or knocked out. They also found that youth who had problems with cavities also […]

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Root Beer – The Safest Soft Drink for your Teeth

Exposing teeth to soft drinks, even for a short period of time, causes dental erosion—and prolonged exposure can lead to significant enamel loss. Root beer products, however, are non-carbonated and do not contain the acids that harm teeth, according to a study in the March/April 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the AGD’s clinical, peer-reviewed journal.  That might be something to consider during the next visit to the grocery store. Consumers often consider soft drinks to be harmless, believing that the only concern is sugar content. Most choose to consume “diet” drinks to alleviate this concern. However, diet drinks contain phosphoric acid and/or citric acid and still cause dental erosion—though considerably less than their sugared counterparts. “Drinking any type of soft drink poses risk to the health of your teeth,” says AGD spokesperson Kenton Ross, DMD, FAGD. Dr. Ross recommends that patients consume fewer soft drinks by limiting their intake to meals. He also advises patients to drink with a straw, which will reduce soda’s contact with teeth. “My patients are shocked to hear that many of the soft drinks they consume battery acid,” Dr. Ross explains. For example, one type of cola ranked 2.39 on the acid scale, compared to […]

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