Archive | Wisdom Teeth

Teen Tooth Trauma Prevalent In Ontario

Nearly one in five Ontario Grade 8 students shows evidence of damage to his or her front teeth, says a new University of Toronto study. This the first study of dental injury done in Ontario, says David Locker, a professor with the U of T Faculty of Dentistry. Similar studies have been done in other countries because tooth trauma is considered one of the most severe conditions children can experience. “Once you break an anterior tooth, you carry that with you for life,” says Locker. “Although it can be treated, there’s a likelihood you’ll need to repeat that treatment every 10 years. The cost of initial treatment can be quite high, depending on the injury, and the lifetime cost is estimated to be as high as $250,000 for four teeth.” Locker and his research team examined a random sample of 14-year-olds in schools served by six Ontario public health departments: Durham region, Halton region, Hamilton, Simcoe County, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph and York region. Overall, 18.5 per cent of the teens almost one in five showed evidence of tooth damage; six per cent exhibited severe damage with teeth broken or knocked out. They also found that youth who had problems with cavities also […]

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Root Beer – The Safest Soft Drink for your Teeth

Exposing teeth to soft drinks, even for a short period of time, causes dental erosion—and prolonged exposure can lead to significant enamel loss. Root beer products, however, are non-carbonated and do not contain the acids that harm teeth, according to a study in the March/April 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the AGD’s clinical, peer-reviewed journal.  That might be something to consider during the next visit to the grocery store. Consumers often consider soft drinks to be harmless, believing that the only concern is sugar content. Most choose to consume “diet” drinks to alleviate this concern. However, diet drinks contain phosphoric acid and/or citric acid and still cause dental erosion—though considerably less than their sugared counterparts. “Drinking any type of soft drink poses risk to the health of your teeth,” says AGD spokesperson Kenton Ross, DMD, FAGD. Dr. Ross recommends that patients consume fewer soft drinks by limiting their intake to meals. He also advises patients to drink with a straw, which will reduce soda’s contact with teeth. “My patients are shocked to hear that many of the soft drinks they consume battery acid,” Dr. Ross explains. For example, one type of cola ranked 2.39 on the acid scale, compared to […]

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Impacted wisdom teeth cause numbness in your tongue and lower jaw

Impacted wisdom teeth can cause a variety of problems, including numbness in the jaw and the tongue. However, this is uncommon. Impacted lower (mandibular) wisdom teeth are often very close to a large nerve (inferior alveolar nerve) that controls feeling (sensation) to the lower jaw, teeth and tongue. Treatment of impacted wisdom teeth typically involves their surgical removal (extraction). This procedure may cause temporary numbness in your jaws, tongue and teeth. However, numbness in the lower jaw and tongue before surgical removal of impacted wisdom teeth is unusual and may indicate a problem that requires further evaluation. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth can be associated with cysts and tumors — usually noncancerous. Other types of growths also can occur in the jaw area and result in the symptoms you describe. Consult your dentist about the numbness you’re experiencing. A clinical and X-ray examination of your mouth, jaws and neck can help detect any potential problems. A panoramic X-ray is the gold standard for initial evaluation, but other imaging tests such as computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging also may be needed. The source of this article is http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/impacted-wisdom-teeth/AN01549 

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Neanderthals had good oral hygiene

Two molar teeth of around 63,400 years old show that Neanderthal predecessors of humans may have been dental hygiene fans, the Web site of newspaper El Pais reported on Tuesday.The teeth have “grooves formed by the passage of a pointed object, which confirms the use of a small stick for cleaning the mouth,” Paleontology Professor Juan Luis Asuarga told reporters, presenting an archaeological find in Madrid. The fossils, unearthed in Pinilla del Valle, are the first human examples found in the Madrid region in 25 years, the regional government’s culture department said. Neanderthals were predecessors of modern humans who inhabited much of Europe, North Africa and parts of Asia from about 125,000 to 30,000 years ago. “There are two (teeth), perfectly preserved, in which the wear and tear of a human of about 30 years old is perceptible,” a government statement said. Experts also found diverse animal fossils, including remains of hyenas, bears, deer and rhinoceroses. Original Reuters article: Turns out Neanderthals had good oral hygiene

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Is Your Dentist Taking Shortcuts?

Most people think of a routine dental appointment as a checkup for cavities and an opportunity to get their teeth polished for a brighter smile. Indeed, those two items are standard. However, you can give your dental professional an A+ for competence if your dental visit goes beyond the basics. There is growing evidence that chronic bacterial infections of the mouth are linked to a number of life-threatening illnesses. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, “Researchers have found that people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease as those without periodontal disease.” Periodontal disease is an infection, and all infections are dangerous. Researchers have found that mouth bacteria can be aspirated into the lung to cause respiratory diseases, such as pneumonia. Gum infections may make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar, therefore increasing diabetic complications. Heart attack and stroke become more of a threat for a person with a chronic mouth infection. Pregnant women are at risk too because a chronic mouth infection for them could mean a threat to the health of the baby. Mothers-to-be with a severe periodontal infection are almost eight times […]

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