Painkiller Overdose in Michigan: Are Wisdom Teeth Extractions Contributing?

Before on this blog I have talked about how oral surgeons prescribe powerful painkillers for use after wisdom teeth removal. It is possible some of these painkillers are instead used for non-medical use. See the posts http://blog.teethremoval.com/comparing-narcotic-prescribing-habits-for-oral-surgeons-in-the-u-s-and-canada/ and http://blog.teethremoval.com/do-oral-surgeons-prescribe-too-many-narcotics-for-use-after-wisdom-teeth-removal/. An interesting article titled “Synder officials take on painkiller overdose ‘epidemic’” located at  http://www.detroitnews.com/story/life/wellness/2015/10/12/prescriptions/73798342/ and written by Gary Heinlein and Joel Kurth, discusses a surge in overdose deaths in Michigan linked to the abuse of pain and anxiety medications (Oct. 12, 2015). One of the cases describe how a man’s addiction to painkillers was aided by a 30-day prescription for Vicodin after his wisdom teeth extraction. The article states “The state’s health department has said overdose deaths linked to opioids were increasing at a faster rate than for illegal drugs such as heroin — also on the rise — and cocaine. A state report also noted that another class of medications called benzodiazepines — prescribed for anxiety — accounted for about 9 percent of deaths.” The governor of Michigan Rick Snyder has created a task force to explore the issue of painkiller overdose deaths. The drugs included those such as fentanyl, codeine and hydrocodone, or brand names such as OxyContin, Demerol and Vicodin. The article later says “According […]

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Experts Insist Flossing Does Nothing to Limit Tooth Decay…Could They Be Correct?

When it comes to orthodontics health and habits, it always seems that someone is telling us what we can and cannot do. Perhaps that is why those studies that make us feel better about not always following the rules makes us feel better. Findings published for the past decade about the effectiveness of flossing on tooth decay has been mixed. Some studies have found that it has no relation to tooth decay while others insist that tooth health is directly related to nothing more than flossing. There seems to be some truth to the scientific findings that the shame we all get by our dental hygienist may not be well founded. Could it be that we need not feel ashamed that flossing is not on our lists of to-dos? The research shows that if you don’t make a daily routine out of flossing, you may not be alone. A reported ten to forty percent of Americans are the only ones who take to their teeth with the thin line of string as recommended. What about the other sixty to ninety percent? Could they know something that those who hold fast to good habits don’t? Could it be possible that flossing […]

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A new marker in blood for migraine?

An interesting article titled “Interictal, circulating sphingolipids in women with episodic migraine: A case-control study” written by B. L. Peterlin and et al. discusses that a new marker in blood may have been found for episodic migraine (Neurology, 2015). Episodic migraine is when a patient has less than 15 headaches per month. The researchers performed a study with 52 women with episodic migraine and 36 women who did not have any headaches. They all had to undergo a neurologic exam, gave blood samples, and had their body mass index measured. The women in the study with migraine had an average of 5.6 headache days per month. The blood samples were tested for a group of lipids that are known to help regulate inflammation in the brain and participate in energy homeostasis. The study found the total levels of lipids called ceramides were decreased in women with episodic migraine when compared to women with no migraines. It was found that women with migraine had approximately 6,000 nanograms per milliliter of total ceramides in their blood and women without headache had about 10,500 nanograms per milliliter. Each standard deviation increase in ceramide levels was found to be associated with over a 92% lower risk of having episodic migraine. The researchers […]

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Blueberry extract could help treat periodontitis

In an article by Amel Ben Lagha and et al titled “Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifoliumAit.) Polyphenols TargetFusobacterium nucleatumand the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases,” a discussion is made that blueberry extract could be used for treating gum disease (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2015; 63 (31)). Gum disease occurs when bacteria form biofilms or plaques on teeth and the gums become inflamed. In ore severe cases this condition is called periodontitis and requires antibiotic use. By potentially using blueberry extract instead of antibiotics periodontitis could be treated. When gum disease occurs the gums get red and swollen an can bleed easily. If the condition is not treated periodontitis can occur. In order to treat periodontitis dentists scrape off tartar and use antiobitics. Researchers have been exploring other natural ways to treat gum disease. As such, researchers have found that blueberry polyphenols which work against foodborne pathogens, can aiding in fighting Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is a main species of bacteria associated with periodontitis. In their lab work, the researchers tested extracts from the wild lowbush blueberry,Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., against Fusobacterium nucleatum.  It was determined that the polyphenol-rich extracts successfully inhibited the growth of Fusobacterium nucleatum. It also lead to the […]

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Wisdom Teeth Surgery: A Patient’s View

Many who come to this blog and website are of course interested in learning more about wisdom teeth removal. In the past I have posted some successful and positive wisdom teeth extraction experiences see http://blog.teethremoval.com/successful-and-positive-wisdom-teeth-removal-experiences/. Even so this site has more negative experiences. For those who want a more detailed positive experience from the surgery an article by Laura Pacey in the May 2014, British Dental Journal titled “Third Molar Surgery” is helpful (vol. 216, issue 9, pp. 490). The article is written by the assistant editor of the British Dental Journal and describes her experience with having three wisdom teeth extracted. As someone who works in the dental field of course she may be more knowledgeable than the average patient. She describes how she feared that she would become another ill-fated statistic concerning complications following wisdom teeth removal. Prior to surgery, she had a CBCT scan performed which revealed that the roots of her lower right wisdom teeth were connected to the nerve below and her lower left wisdom tooth was close to the inferior alveolar nerve. As such she had her upper right wisdom tooth extracted and coronectomy performed on both lower wisdom teeth. She also describes having […]

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