How to Protect Yourself from Abusive Doctors

John A. McDougall, MD, is a physician and nutrition expert who considers himself a leader of public opinion and often finds it necessary to challenge the accepted wisdom of the time. Dr. McDougall produces a newsletter over on his website. In the October 2011, vol. 10, issue 10, edition he writes about “How to Protect Yourself from Abusive Medical Doctors.” http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2011nl/oct/protect.pdf I think the entire article is well worth the read but I will cover some of the more interesting parts here. Dr. McDougall discuses a case where he has a patient named Marsha who has a history of precancerous changes in the tissues lining her uterus known as endometrial hyperplasia. Over 2 years her condition progressed to early stage cancer. Two surgeons whom she consulted with recommended a hysterectomy as the treatment. Dr. McDougall has a telephone consultation with a young Obstetrician/Gynecologist. This doctor is described as being aggressive, inappropriate, and attempts to humiliate Dr. McDougall during the consultation. Dr. McDougall merely wanted to see the research that supported her recommended treatment of a hysterectomy. Dr. McDougall requests for the Obstetrician/Gynecologist to send him scientific studies that reasonably show that surgery is beneficial. Articles are sent and Dr. McDougall reviews the articles and says he could see no […]

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How Jaws Shrink With Age and Does This Affect Wisdom Teeth Crowding?

A recent article titled “A 40 years follow-up of dental arch dimensions and incisor irregularity in adults.” by Nokolasos, Tsiopas, Maria Nilner, Lars Bondemark, and Krister Bjerklin, appearing the The European Journal of Orthodontics Advance Access published October 19, 2011, explores how the jaw is affected over a 40 year time period. The study started in 1949 with 22 males and 13 females (35 total) and after 40 years in 1989, 18 of these participants were still able to participate. Three dental stone study casts were made for the 18 participants who completed the 40 years of the study. The authors state: “The present study showed that the occlusion, overbite, and overjet was stable, but dentoalveolar changes occur in the adult dentition. In the anterior part of the dentition, decreases in arch length and width lead to anterior crowding. There was also an increase in dental arch width at the first permanent molar.” The authors conclude the article by saying “The dentoalveolar processes continue to undergo physiological changes throughout adult life. Of particular clinical relevance is the finding that decreases in arch length and depth result in a decrease in intercanine width and increased crowding of the anterior teeth. These findings have important […]

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Urge Congress To Make Health Care a Service, Not a Business!

For everyone living in the United States I encourage you to: URGE CONGRESS TO MAKE HEALTH CARE A SERVICE AND NOT A BUSINESS. Here is the link to to write to Congress to https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml The last I heard Congress had a dismal 9% approval rating. Here is also the  link to find your Senator http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm So why should you write to Congress? Well here is what other dental professionals are saying about my website. “I know this is a bit wordy, but our professional reputation may have become tainted because of a few who have reached national notoriety in a negative light. I don’t know how prevalent such unethical practices are, but we should all remember that patients don’t get mad at one doctor or one office, they paint the whole profession. It’s up to all of us to keep that reputation high.” Donna Domina. Is dentistry facing an ethical dilemma? October 25, 2011. http://www.drbicuspid.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=pmt&pag=dis&ItemID=308952  Glen “Why should we do the ethical and get nothing while the others trample on us.” glenp via http://www.drbicuspid.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=pmt&pag=dis&ItemID=308952  glenp  “Some others, he noted, have proclaimed ‘what they think is their rightful place’ within the nation’s health care system. “Not on my watch!” Dr. Calnon said emphatically, stirring applause from the delegates.” […]

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Wisdom of Having that Tooth Removed: AAOMS Response

Recently I indicated in a post over here http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-advice-and-new-dental-schools/ that a New York Times article was run on September 5, 2011, by Roni Caryn Rabin which was titled “Wisdom of Having That Tooth Removed.” This article is located here http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/06/health/06consumer.html Recently a Letter to the Editor of the New York Times was written by the President of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, Arthur C. Jee, discussing this article located at http://www.aaoms.org/docs/media/LetterNYTimes-09-21-11.pdf In the article he states The AAOMS does not advocate for the “prophylactic extraction of wisdom teeth” If this is in fact the case then I think the AAOMS should make this clear on their website. The website on wisdom teeth http://www.aaoms.org/wisdom_teeth.php continues to say “As you can see, it isn’t wise to wait until your wisdom teeth start to hurt you before you have them removed. “ Even so the wisdom teeth page on AAOMS has been updated a bit since the last time I looked.  It does mention at the bottom that you may keep your wisdom teeth after previously discussing many of the problems that wisdom teeth can cause if you keep them. Further in the letter Dr Jee says  “an absence of […]

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Behavioral Treatment for Migraine Headaches

A recently study titled Direct Costs of Preventive Headache Treatments: Comparison of Behavioral and Pharmacologic Approaches appearing in Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, 51 (6): 985 -991, June 2011, and written by Allison M. Shafer et al., finds that treating chronic migraines using inexpensive prophylactic medicines such as beta-blockers or tricyclic antidepressants and behavioral approaches such as relaxation training, biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy, and stress management are a low cost and effective treatment option particularly after 1 year of treatment. The authors used a cost minimization analysis and found that after 1 year, the cost of minimal-contact behavioral treatment was cheaper than the least expensive headache treatment medications. Minimal-contact or home based intervention is when a patient sees a therapist for around 3 or 4 visits and  largely practices the behavioral techniques at home through the use of printed materials and audio recordings. For those who would prefer more visits with a therapist the researchers also found that clinic-based behavioral treatment where a therapist is seen in 8 to 12 weekly sessions becomes cost competitive with medications within 6 months and cheaper than most of the medications available for headache prevention within 1 year. The study concludes “While […]

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