The Cyberchondriac: Managing the Difficult Patient

There is an interesting series over at QuantiaMD on Managing the Difficult Patient. Presentations are available for viewing as long as you sign up for with your email. One such presentation was originally called The Patient Who Knows too much but has been changed to The Cyberchondriac. http://quantiamd.com/player/wywzswwh?courseid=31844 Mary Modahl  who is QuantiaMD Chief Communications Officer said after the original title was added  “‘The Patient Who Knows Too Much’ is a very poor title. Certainly a patient can never know too much. In every way, we’re supportive of doctors meeting their patients’ need for care.” Dr. Joseph Scherger, vice president for primary care at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, California, defines a Cyberchondriac in the presentation: “This is a patient who is on the internet…indiscriminate with the material they are reading…they consider themselves an expert yet often their true medical knowledge is limited…they are pushing you to do things based on their information.” Dr. Scherger takes a jab at Cyberchondriacs and says “…sometimes these patients are very overweight, they are on the internet all the time…” He also says that if a patient is going to bring in a stack of materials from the internet they should send it in […]

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Do I Really Need to Remove My Wisdom Teeth?

A few days ago an article titled “Do I Really Need to Remove My Wisdom Teeth? appeared in Community Magazine by Jacques Doueck located at http://www.communitym.com/article.asp?article_id=101936  The article opens with “I was prompted to write this article because of two adult patients who suffered severe damage, infection, and swelling because they delayed taking out wisdom teeth. One of them actually broke his jaw because of a wisdom tooth that should have been removed long ago. The patient, 48 years old, lost both teeth and the fractured jaw forced him to eat baby food for six months. The other patient was 65 years old and had to have the wisdom tooth and the adjacent molar removed.” This opening in this article kind of cracks me up because both of these patients are quite old, especially the 65 year old. Of course we could go back and forth all day with between cases like the above and cases of young healthy individuals such as myself who had there wisdom teeth removed at a young age and then had lasting pain and problems for life. Numerous reports of complications from wisdom teeth extractions are indicated at the wisdom teeth stories page and complications page. […]

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Fraud and Abuse in Medicaid Clinics

I have previously discussed on this blog how students graduating from medical school have an average debt of around $158,000 and the average debt of those graduating from undergraduate college is around $27,000 in the U.S.  In fact, the video called College Conspiracy http://blog.teethremoval.com/college-conspiracy-and-united-states-hyperinflation/ profiles a dentist who is stuck with with high loans from school  (around the 11 minute mark). One quote appearing in this video is “…as soon as you get out of school you are indentured for life.” This figure below showing the inflation cost of college tuition (in blue), medical care (in red), and general inflation (in black) from http://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/College.html pretty much tells more of the story. In fact I would argue that college tuition costs and medical costs are correlated with each other and you should be able to calculate some sort of correlation coefficient. An interesting article titled “Our Junior Colleagues and Interstate Medicaid Clinics” written by Michael W. Davis DDS appears in the New Mexico Dental Journal, Fall 2011, vol. 62, no. 4, pages 24-28, helps further show the major problems with increasing college tuition and how this directly impacts and increases medical care costs. The article is available over at http://dentistthemenace.com/documents/M%20Davis%20NMDA%20Fall%202011.pdf The article discusses how often dentists are stuck with […]

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Wisdom Teeth Advice and New Dental Schools

A new article in the New York Times titled “Wisdom of Having that Tooth Removed” written by Roni Caryn Rabin published September 5, 2011, is an interesting articles for those considering whether or not to have healthy wisdom teeth extracted. The article is located at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/06/health/06consumer.html The article explores some of the issues regarding whether or not you should or not have have healthy wisdom teeth extracted. The article discusses how the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) held a press conference back in October of 2010, http://www.aaoms.org/docs/media/third_molars/key_findings.pdf, in which one of the key findings was “Retained, asymptomatic wisdom teeth are eventually extracted between 25% and almost 70% of the time.” The author of the New York Times article questioned AAOMS on this statement which appeared on their website. The response from AAOMS was “Yet when asked, the association was not able to produce the evidence for these figures.” The author concludes “As for my daughter Emma, we have opted for watchful waiting. She went off to college last month, wisdom teeth and all.” An interesting article by the American Dental Association (ADA) titled “Special Report: An in-depth look at new dental schools” by Karen Fox published September […]

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Swimming and the Potential Harmful Effects on Your Teeth

Recently an article has appeared on DrBicupsid.com titled Swimming in acidic pool nearly destroys man’s teeth written by Rob Goszkowski and posted on September 6, 2011, located at http://www.drbicuspid.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=rst&pag=dis&ItemID=308363 The article describes a case of a 52 year old man who nearly lost the enamel of his teeth in just 5 month by swimming regularly at his home pool. In fact, while it is widely appreciated that exercising regularly is good for your health you should consider the potential harm of any sort of new exercise program and yes this includes swimming and even walking. This man was suffering from hemangiomas in his liver and was told by his doctor to stop jogging so he decided on his own that he would take up swimming and in fact would do so for 90 minutes a day at a pool in his house that was not being professionally maintained. It was found that the reason for his rapid enamle erosion was due to having a highly acidic chlorinated swimming pool (low pH). The normal pH of a pool should be between 7.2 and 7.6 which is considered to be basic. Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/gcwest/136945653/ and has a Creative Commons License. Tom over […]

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