Patient’s Perception of Antibiotic Need After Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Patients’ Perception of the Need for Antibiotics Following Routine Tooth Extraction,” appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Sugery and written by Charles D. Boxx and Daniel M. Laskin (vol. 73, issue 5). The article seeks to perform a study of 120 patients having teeth removed in Richmond, Virginia, at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), to see their perception of antibiotic need. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about whether they expected to be prescribed antibiotics after tooth extraction, whether they would request them if not prescribed and the reason why, and whether they would expect to be prescribed antibiotics for a toothache or a dental abscess. The patients were further asked if they had ever requested antibiotics from a medical doctor for a cold. The patients also indicated their gender, age, and level of education. The study group consisted of 61 women and 59 women with an average age of 48 years. Eighty of the 120 patients expected (66.7%) to receive an antibiotic after tooth removal. There was found to be no statistical difference in the age and education of the positive and negative groups. Seventy percent of […]

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Using Povidone Iodine After Wisdom Teeth Removal

The article titled “Effect of Low-Concentration Povidone Iodine on Postoperative Complications After Third Molar Surgery: A Pilot Split-Mouth Study” written by Hamid Mahmoud Hashemi and et. al. appears in the January 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol. 73, issue 1). The article discusses polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine which is a highly potent antiseptic solution known for its bactericidal activity. The authors performed a prospective randomized split mouth study of patients undergoing surgical removal of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth to evaluate whether diluted povidone iodine can be used as an irrigant and coolant and if it has any effect on common postoperative sequelae, including swelling, pain, and trismus. A total of 30 healthy patients (18 to 25 yr old) with bilateral impacted mandibular wisdom with similar position and degree of impaction were recruited at Tehran University in Iran between March 2012 and September 2012. One impacted mandibular wisdom teeth in the first patient was randomly allocated to the study side by using a coin and the other side served as the control. In the subsequent patient, the opposite sides were allocated to the study and control groups. The teeth were removed under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine and […]

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Vertigo and Dizziness After Wisdom Teeth Removal

One of the rare complications that can occur after wisdom teeth removal is Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) where one experiences symptoms of vertigo and dizziness. This is discussed over on the wisdom teeth complications page at http://www.teethremoval.com/complications.html. I have a long running survey on this website where I ask people to share their experiences with wisdom teeth removal see http://teethremoval.polldaddy.com/s/6E8CF57E23BD9041. Some previous survey responses appear over at http://blog.teethremoval.com/successful-and-positive-wisdom-teeth-removal-experiences/, http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-surgery-survey/, http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-extraction-survey/, and http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-survey/. A few recent entries to my survey have discussed what seems to be getting BPPV after wisdom teeth removal. A Canadian women who had wisdom teeth extracted at age 21 said: “Diagnosed with BPPV 7 months after removal and chronic sinus infections that started 2 months after removal of wisdom teeth.” An American man who had wisdom teeth extracted at age 30 said: ” I went to a dentist for the extraction of a tooth next to upper right wisdom tooth. Dentist suggested to take out wisdom tooth as well when I didn’t have a problem with it. I started having dizziness on the third day after surgery. I still have the dizziness. I asked my dentist about the problem I had who said it hasn’t anything […]

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The Importance of Reputation Management for Dentists

The dental malpractice law field is alive with some companies encouraging patients to sue dentists. It is possible for dentists to have as many as three or more complaints lodged against them at a single time. This causes stress to dentists and dampens the quality of care provided for patients. Whilst we can’t, unfortunately, change the culture that allows this to occur dentists can take steps to try and manage their reputation and reduce the risk to have a suit. These techniques can be used to improve customer interactions and try to mitigate any negative feelings or resentments patients may feel . So how can dentists manage their reputation more effectively? Patient Interactions The most important place to start is with patient care. With often heinously busy schedules dentists can skip over some of the niceties of patient interactions. However, when it comes to the perception of patients these small interactions make a world of difference. Dentists are encouraged to open sessions with a little small talk – even if only a few seconds. This helps relax the patient and develop a personal rather than professional connection. Dentists who relate to their patients can cause patients to be less likely to sue or to leave negative reviews. Make […]

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The History of Dental Pain Management: The Progress That Has Been Made

This is a guest article by Dr. Justin Clemens. Within the past 30 – 40 years, it has become increasingly popular to sedate patients to have dental work completed. Although this seems like a long time, in the sense of medicine and dentistry, it really isn’t. This is where the true melding point of medicine and dentistry occurred. Let’s take a little trip in time to see where we began in dentistry to help us better understand where we are now in terms of pain management. The most recent of what we would call “modern dentists” were more like “tooth mechanics”. They were simply drill and fill or just yank it out with no numbing at all. This was until the advent of cocaine in the late 1800s. It is from cocaine that we derive all of our synthetic local anesthetics with which you may be familiar. The big ones that might ring a bell would be Novacaine, Lidocaine and Septocaine, just to name a few. These essentially made dentistry painless. Patients can still feel anxious about dentistry even with all those drugs available. This is because of the hundreds of years of barbaric dentistry before these drugs were invented. It is not […]

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