Tag Archives | bacteria

Removing Wisdom Teeth May Improve The Periodontal Health of Remaining Teeth

An interesting article titled “Removal of Symptomatic Third Molars May Improve Periodontal Status of Remaining Dentition,” by Carolyn Dicus-Brookes and et al. appears in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol. 71, pp. 1639-1646, 2013). The article seeks to explore the impact of removing wisdom teeth on the periodontal status of adjacent second molars and other teeth located in the mouth specifically for patients who have mild symptoms of pericoronitis. As discussed recently over at Upcoming Changes to JOMS and AAOMS in 2014, select articles in JOMS will have press releases written by AAOMS staff to accompany them. This is one of those articles so that feature appears to have already been rolled out. To get an idea of what the press release entails I will briefly describe it. It is very short (less than 10 sentences) and fits on 1 page. It was released on October 1, 2013. The press release states 69 patients were followed with mild symptoms of pericoronitis. All patients had wisdom teeth prior to the study start and had an average age of 21. The main conclusion of the study as stated in the press release, is that at the beginning of the study […]

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Gingivitis Bacteria Manipulate Your Immune System

An interesting article appears in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology discussing how the bacteria known for causing gum disease–Porphyromonas gingivalis–can manipulate the immune system to disable normal processes that would otherwise destroy it.The article talks about how this bacteria causes the anti-inflammatory molecule Interleukin-10 (IL-10) which inhibits the function of T-cells which would otherwise help to fight off the bacteria. The researchers discuss how it is important to understand how gingivitis bacteria affect the immune system since more than 50% of adults over 50 in the U.S. develop periodontal disease. The researchers used cells from mice that were exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis and had some of them treated with an inhibiting antibody against IL-10 and the other portion of cells was not treated. The cells were then tested for interferon gamma production. The researchers found that an increase of interferon gamma production was seen in the treated cells, however no increase was found in the untreated cells. This study illustrates the mechanism by which Porphyromonas gingivalis can establish a chronic infection in the form of periodontal disease and the progression of the disease. Researchers believe that early intervention can help eradicate the bacteria and is important for possible designed therapeutics or […]

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Oral Bacteria That Causes Periodontitis Delievers a One-Two Punch

Oral health care workers and scientists have know for many years that bacteria cause periodontitis (gum disease); however, they were not sure exactly what bacteria was response. Recently the bacteria that causes periodontitis (gum disease) has been identified by a University of Michigan study. This bacterium is known as NI1060. It was also found that this triggers a normally protetive protein in the oral cavity called Nod1 to trigger bone destroying cells. In normal circumstances Nod1 fights harmful bacterium in the body. Hence, it was that the bacteria that causes gum disease triggers a one-two punch by also causing normally protective proteins to then destroy more bone. In normal cases No1 helps to fight infection by recruiting neutrophils which are blood cells that act as bacterial killers. Nod1 also removes harmful bacteria during infection. When periodontitis (gum disease) occurs NI1060 will cause Nod1 to trigger neutrophils and also osteoclasts which are cells that destroy bone. The researchers are encouraged by the results in that they can help to better develop personalized therapy for dental patients. Periodontitis (gum disease) has been discussed on this site before numerous times. In one blog post it is discussed how Gum Disease Is More Common […]

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Lactobacillus Reuteri Helps Oral Health

A recent study by researchers at Malmö University in Sweden show that the lactic acid bacteria called Lactobacillus reuteri improves oral health. Lactobacillus reuteri was first discovered in the 1960s and at this time 30-40% of the population had it naturally in their bodies. Today this number is down to around 10-20% of the population and this is believed to be due to changes in lifestyle and food consumption. Many preservatives found in foods today kill the bacteria. Gabriela Sinkiewicz a researcher at Malmö University also found that Lactobacillus reuteri occurs naturally in breast milk of women but that on average women in Japan and Korea have higher concentrations. Gabriela Sinkiewicz says that Lactobacillus reuteri is important for infants as it help’s their intestinal system and immune system. In addition, she determiend that that the occurrence of both plaque and bleeding from the gums declined after only two weeks of using chewing gum containing certain strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. There are curently numerous studies underway to explore how Lactobacillus reuteri and it’s link to oral health and allergies. If you are familar with the probiotic called Culturelle, which can be bought at a pharmacy such as CVS, it contains Lactobacillus […]

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Poor Dental Health Linked to Atherosclerosis

Previous research has shown that poor dental health and periodontitis have been linked to atherosclerosis, which is a condition where fatty material collects along artery walls. This causes the arteries to become narrower and can lead to cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks, angina (chest pain), and stroke. Researchers in Sweden recently tested the hypotheses that bacteria from the mouth and/or the gut could end up in the atherosclerotic plaque and contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. The researchers found the number of bacteria in the plaque correlated with the number of white blood cells. This meant that this was a cause of inflammation. The researchers used sequencing methods to determine the composition of the bacteria in the mouth, gut and arterial plaque of 15 patients in both a control and a study group. They observed that bacteria were found in the atherosclerotic plaques and mostly in  the mouth, but also in the gut, of the same patient. They observed that the bacteria Pseudomonas luteola and Chlamydia pneumoniae were present in all atherosclerotic plaques. These results indicate that bacteria enters the body from the mouth and gut and ends up as atherosclerotic plaque which can contribute to inflammation and […]

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