Development of new restorative dental materials for cavities

New research by Salvatore Sauro, who is a professor of dental biomaterials, has shown that new dental biomaterials can help regenerate dental hard tissues. The work occurred at CEU Cardenal Herrera University, in Spain, with collaboration of researchers from other parts of Europe. Bacterial plaque which causes tooth decay due to acids produced by different bacteria species; has led to research for the development of restorative biomaterials. The international group of researchers generated two new dental restorative biomaterials containing bioactive glasses, and explored their effectiveness in reducing the enzymatic auto-degradation of collagen fibres and evoking their remineralization. The researchers set out to evaluate the inhibition of endogenous proteolytic enzymes of dentin and the remineralization induced by two experimental resins containing bioactive glasses. The first resin contains micro-particles of Bioglass 45S5 and the other one contains micro-particles of an experimental bioactive glass enriched with … Read more

How to Prevent Gum Disease and Cavities

The following is a Guest Post by Dr. Richard Mitchell who has been a dentist for over 30 years and has experience in 6 different countries. Dr. Richard Mitchell has a website with excellent dental advice at It’s impossible to guarantee problem-free teeth,  but you can stack the odds in your favor by following a short routine each day! FIFTEEN MINUTES A DAY. That’s all it takes to really make a difference.  Can you find 15 minutes? Here’s a bonus. You don’t have to spend those fifteen minutes in the bathroom – with a little practice,  you can do most of the work sitting on the couch watching TV! OK,  what are the things to do? First of all,  don’t worry about the brand of toothbrush.  Like Lance Armstrong said,  “it’s not the bike”.  When we’re talking about getting … Read more

How does Flouride really Protect Teeth from Cavities?

A recent study that appeared in the journal Langmuir looked into the role of fluoride and their protection on teeth. The researchers who published the journal article found the protective shield fluoride forms on teeth is up to 100 times thinner than what was previously thought. It is well known that fluoride is found in toothpaste, mouthwash, and public drinking water in many areas in the world. The use of fluoride of course is to help prevent tooth decay which causes cavities to form. Researchers found the fluorapatite layer created by fluoride on the hard white substance covering teeth’s surface called enamel is only 6 nanometers thick. This layer is very small and over 10 times thinner than what was indicated in any prior studies. Hence the researchers raise questions about how a layer so thin can protect teeth from … Read more

Genes Linked to Cavities

Two recent papers y researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine and their collaborators suggest that specific genetic variations may be linked to higher rates of tooth decay (cavities) and aggressive periodontitis, which is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and bones that support the teeth. Dental cavities have been found to be influenced by individual variations in a gene called beta defensin 1(DEFB1), which plays a key role in the first-line immune response against invading germs. For one of the studies, the researchers analyzed nearly 300 anonymous dental records and accompanying saliva samples from the their dental registry, assigning each case a DMFT score based on the presence of decayed teeth, missing teeth due to caries, and tooth fillings. In addition each case also received a DMFS score, based on decayed teeth, missing teeth, and filled … Read more