Updated Sedation Guidelines in Dentistry for Children

Recently new guidelines have been issued regarding the use of sedation for dental procedures performed on children. In the past on this site some scrutiny has been placed on sedation provided to children during dental procedures because of many deaths that have occurred, see for example What to Ask the Dentist Before Children Have Sedation and Pediatric Dental Death in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada Spurs Comments on Dental Anesthesia. In the June 2019 edition (vol. 143, no. 6) of Pediatrics in an article titled Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures written by Coté and Wilson updated guidelines for the use of sedation in dentistry is provided. These guidelines were updated for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for the first time in … Read more

How to Safely Remove Your Teeth

Both adults and children need teeth removal at one point. For children, it is a normal and natural process. Sometimes for adults, it is due to problematic teeth or health conditions. Tooth extraction is a delicate process that requires the attention of a trained dentist. For children, you are advised to let the teeth to completely become loose and fall out by itself or have the dentist remove it. Here are some tips when it comes time to remove your teeth: 1. Removing Teeth in Children This is a natural process that happens to every child. According to dentists, you should not try to hurry the process. The teeth will become loose and fall out by themselves or with a little assistance. Trying to pull the teeth too early will cause too much pain for the child. It may also … Read more

Fluoride Mouthrinse May reduce Dental Caries in Children and Adolescents

An interesting article titled “Limited evidence suggests fluoride mouthrinse may reduce dental caries in children and adolescents” appears in the April 2017 issue of JADA written by Linda L. Cheng (issue 7, p263–266). The article explores the following question “In children and adolescents, does fluoride mouthrinse prevent dental caries compared with a placebo or no treatment?” The article discusses how reviewers searched 9 databases with no restriction on language or date of publication up through April 22, 2016. At least 2 reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Dental caries were defined as clinical and radiographic lesions recorded at the dentin level of diagnosis. A total of  37 trials involving 15,813 children and adolescents, aged 6-14 years, were included in the results. Nearly all of the trials were conducted in schools on the supervised use of fluoride mouthrinse except … Read more

When Should Children Start Using Fluoride Toothpaste?

There is some conflicting information about when children should start using fluoride toothpaste. Studies have suggested that young children who consume large amounts of fluoride through fluoridated water, beverages, and toothpaste have an increased chance of developing mild enamel fluorosis see http://blog.teethremoval.com/large-amounts-of-fluoride-consumed-by-young-children-leads-to-fluorosis/. Hence some felt that not using any fluoridated toothpaste when a child was young was the better choice, whereas some felt that that using a small amount of fluoride toothpaste was okay In 2014, the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs updated its guidance on the use of fluoride toothpaste for children. The new guidance is that children’s teeth should be brushed with fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first tooth comes in. The idea is to provide children with the full benefit of cavity protection while also minimizing the risk of the development of fluorosis. The ADA’s Council on … Read more

Bacteria and Fungus Can Team Up to Cause Cavities

An interesting article titled “Symbiotic relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans synergizes the virulence of plaque-biofilms in vivo,” appears in the February 2014, edition of Infection and Immunity, written by Megan L. Falsetta and et al. The article describes how although Streptococcus mutans is often cited as the main bacteria in dental caries (cavities), particularly in early-childhood caries (ECCs), it may not act alone and may team up with Candida albicans. The infection with both can double the number of caries and increase their severity as it did for rats in the study. Candida albicans adheres mainly to the cheek and tongue, while Streptococcus mutans sticks to the surfaces of teeth by converting sugars to a sticky glue-like material called extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). The researchers found that the exoenzyme that S. mutans uses to react with sugar to produce EPS also … Read more