Tag Archives | controversy

Systematic Review of Prophylactic Extraction of Third Molars: From Brazil

Many reviews have been conducted in recent years to determine if healthy third molars (known as wisdom teeth) should be prophylacticly extracted as in removed before causing problems. A new study by Moacir Guilherme da Costa and four other researchers titled “Is there justification for prophylactic extraction of third molars? A systematic review,” appears in Braz Oral Res., (São Paulo) 2013 Mar-Apr;27(2):183-8. The article discusses how in the United States roughly 10 million wisdom teeth are extracted from around 5 million individuals each year. The article discuss how several reasons are usually given for extracting wisdom teeth pericoronitis periodontal defects in the distal region of the second molar caries in the third or second molars different types of odontogenic cysts and tumors crowding of the lower incisors indications for orthodontic, prosthetic or restorative purposes The authors state how the majority of dental surgeons feel when there is clinical, radiological or laboratorial evidence of acute or chronic periodontitis, caries, pericoronitis, harmful effects on second molars or disease the removal of third molars is justified. The authors mentioned how several controversies arise surrounding removing healthy asymptomatic wisdom teeth including inadequate study designs small sample size insufficient monitoring time methodological flaws Hence the […]

Continue Reading 0

Oral Surgery Misconduct During Wisdom Teeth Removal

In other posts on this blog I have talked about unfortunately there have been cases of misconduct occuring during wisdom teeth removal. See for example In Light of the Allegations of Child Sex Abuse at Penn State… and expanded on and discussed in greater detail over at http://www.teethremoval.com/sexual_assault_under_anesthesia_for_wisdom_teeth_removal.html. In a recent case an oral surgeon in Massachusetts  was found guilty of fondling a 16 year old female patient while she was under sedation and having her wisdom teeth extracted. The oral surgeon was convicted of incident assault and battery and sentenced to 1 year in jail.  The patient in this case was fully clothed and another staff member of the dental team saw the misconduct occurring. These cases are unfortunate. In order for both patients and dentists and/or surgeons to avoid issues nurses or other chaperones should be present during the surgery. In addition, in other cases, a side effect of some of the drugs given during surgery is sexual hallucinations. Therefore, there may be instances where misconduct really did not occur but the patient believed it did. Hence, a nurse or other chaperone present can help mitigate potential issues that can arise. Source: Boston Herald, Mass oral surgeon guilty of […]

Continue Reading 0

Reads like a Dentist’s Advertisement

I periodically like to check out the wisdom tooth page over on Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_tooth Recently I came across the talk page which has an interesting comment near the bottom written on September 3, 2012, “There is very little discussion of how common it is to have wisdom teeth, and how often wisdom teeth pose no problems if left alone. Nor is there adequate discussion of how often extraction is necessary when they do pose problems. Some lip service is paid to it in the “controversy” ghetto, but in the end the discussion of the “controversy” is equivocating and unclear. As a whole, the article conjured up the image of an eager, pushy dentist insisting that, “Yeah, buddy, wisdom teeth are a huge problem! It may not seem like it, but it’s bad – trust me, I know these things – I mean, would I lie to you? We’ll have to do an extraction, but don’t worry! Here, just sign your agreement to all these expensive medical procedures…” No offense meant to the contributors. At least the discussion of the pathology is extensive.” I personally think the wisdom tooth page on Wikipedia could use some work as it seems a bit […]

Continue Reading 0

Third Molars (aka Wisdom Teeth): Kandasamy vs White and Proffit

Like usual there are often heated exchanges over the management of wisdom teeth (third molars). Back in November 2011, in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (vol. 140, issue 5)  there was an exchange regarding two previous articles that had appeared and consequent exchange (White RP Jr, Proffit WR. Evaluation and management of asymptomatic third molars: lack of symptoms does not equate to lack of pathology. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;140:10-6; and Kandasamy S. Evaluation and management of asymptomatic third molars: watchful monitoring is a low-risk alternative to extraction. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;140:11-7) The articles in question I am referring to here are “Third molars” by Raymond P. White, Jr, and William R. Proffit in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (vol. 140, issue 5, pages 600-601) and Author’s response by Sanjivan Kandasamy in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (vol. 140, issue 5, pages 601-602) . In the “Third molars” article the authors provide 5 points which are what they feel are inaccuracies and unsupported opinions which appeared in the prior July 2011 article by Dr. Kandasamy (“Evaluation and management of asymptomatic third molars: watchful monitoring is a low-risk alternative […]

Continue Reading 0

Review of the Wisdom Behind Third Molar Extractions

Back in 2009, an article titled  The wisdom behind third molar extractions” by “S Kandasamy and DJ Rinchuse appeared in the Australian Dental Journal (54. pages 284-292. 2009) I discussed some of the provocative comments in this article in the post Bringing About Healthcare Change. To reiterate he states “…in the 21st century, the routine removal of asymptomatic pathology- free third molars has become a dated practice that is rapidly running out of valid excuses, and it has no justification in contemporary dentistry and medicine.” Earlier this year an article titled “Patient Specific Variables are a Consideration in the Decision to Extract Asymptomatic Third Molars” by Katerine W. L. Vig appeared in the J Evid Base Dent Pract. (2012 12 pp. 92-94) The conclusion of this article is “The removal of third molars to avoid lower incisor crowding is not justified. Clear indications exist for removal of third molars associated with pathology. Asymptomatic partially or fully erupted third molars are best retained and monitored regularly for periodontal maintenance, especially those with associated pockets greater than 4mm. Risks with retaining third molars should be put in the context of the overall medical condition of the patient with the potential for systemic involvement.” […]

Continue Reading 0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes