Tag Archives | dental health

Lactobacillus Reuteri Helps Oral Health

A recent study by researchers at Malmö University in Sweden show that the lactic acid bacteria called Lactobacillus reuteri improves oral health. Lactobacillus reuteri was first discovered in the 1960s and at this time 30-40% of the population had it naturally in their bodies. Today this number is down to around 10-20% of the population and this is believed to be due to changes in lifestyle and food consumption. Many preservatives found in foods today kill the bacteria. Gabriela Sinkiewicz a researcher at Malmö University also found that Lactobacillus reuteri occurs naturally in breast milk of women but that on average women in Japan and Korea have higher concentrations. Gabriela Sinkiewicz says that Lactobacillus reuteri is important for infants as it help’s their intestinal system and immune system. In addition, she determiend that that the occurrence of both plaque and bleeding from the gums declined after only two weeks of using chewing gum containing certain strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. There are curently numerous studies underway to explore how Lactobacillus reuteri and it’s link to oral health and allergies. If you are familar with the probiotic called Culturelle, which can be bought at a pharmacy such as CVS, it contains Lactobacillus […]

Continue Reading 0

Poor Dental Health Linked to Atherosclerosis

Previous research has shown that poor dental health and periodontitis have been linked to atherosclerosis, which is a condition where fatty material collects along artery walls. This causes the arteries to become narrower and can lead to cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks, angina (chest pain), and stroke. Researchers in Sweden recently tested the hypotheses that bacteria from the mouth and/or the gut could end up in the atherosclerotic plaque and contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. The researchers found the number of bacteria in the plaque correlated with the number of white blood cells. This meant that this was a cause of inflammation. The researchers used sequencing methods to determine the composition of the bacteria in the mouth, gut and arterial plaque of 15 patients in both a control and a study group. They observed that bacteria were found in the atherosclerotic plaques and mostly in  the mouth, but also in the gut, of the same patient. They observed that the bacteria Pseudomonas luteola and Chlamydia pneumoniae were present in all atherosclerotic plaques. These results indicate that bacteria enters the body from the mouth and gut and ends up as atherosclerotic plaque which can contribute to inflammation and […]

Continue Reading 1

Fluoride in Water at Birth Helps Dental Health in Later Adult Life

A new study has looked at how fluoride in water that you drink when you are a child affects your teeth when you reach middle age. The study was done by Matthew Neidell and his colleagues and has found that the when you are a child and have added fluoride in your water it will help with dental health much later in adult life. “Your fluoridation exposure at birth is affecting your tooth loss in your 40s and 50s, regardless of what your fluoridation exposure was like when you were 20 and 30 years old,” said Neidell. Neidell and his researchers used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention community health study in addition to a water census to look at the impact of drinking fluoridated water in the 1950s and 1960s on tooth loss in the 1990s. The American Dental Association recommends having public water contain fluoride.  There is a lot of history of water fluoridation and opposition. New studies such as this one by Neidell attempt to show scientifically that there is a benefit to water fluoridation. If you are interested in learning more about water fluoridation the Wikipedia article is a good place to start. […]

Continue Reading 2

Dentalhealth.org

I wanted to let everyone know about the site dentalheath.org. It is a site by the British Dental Health Foundation. There is a section for the public, a section for the press, and a section for professionals. Most people will find the Dental Health Information Leaflets section in the for the public part of the website to be useful. There are numerous useful dental related categories such as wisdom teeth, what to do following an extraction, x-rays, and so on. Since the site is from the British Dental Health Foundation, it’s intended audience is for people who live in Britain so this is important to keep in mind. Even so the information can be helpful for everyone. The site is arranged so that frequently asked questions for each category are asked and then answered. For example, in the wisdom teeth category, a question is “What are the main reasons for taking wisdom teeth out?” The answer is Far fewer wisdom teeth are now taken out than in the past. If the tooth is not causing problems, your dentist will not want to remove it. They will only remove wisdom teeth: – when it is clear that they will not be […]

Continue Reading 0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes