Tooth Decay Higher in Children Who do not Drink Tap Water, But Blood Lead Levels Lower

A new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has shown that American children who do not drink tap water are much more likely to have tooth decay than those who do, but also less likely to have elevated levels of lead in their blood. Due to some dangers reported from drinking tap water which includes fluoride and potentially other contaminants, some parents have opted to not give it to their child and instead have opted for bottled or filtered water for drinking. See http://blog.teethremoval.com/large-amounts-of-fluoride-consumed-by-young-children-leads-to-fluorosis/ for more information on the dangerous of fluoride for young children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), adding fluoride to the water supply has dramatically reduced the prevalence of tooth decay over the past 70 years. Even so tooth decay is still a large problem affecting the primary teeth of over 20% of U.S. preschoolers … Read more

Elements of Lithium in Water Slows Alzheimer’s Disease Death

New research shows that trace elements of lithium in drinking water may slow down death rates from Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, rates of diabetes and obesity also decrease if there is lithium in the drinking water. Usually when one hears about something in the drinking water it is in regard to fluoride or lead. For example see the post talking about how if fluoride in drinking water lowers intelligence at http://blog.teethremoval.com/fluoride-in-water-does-not-lower-intelligence/. Lead in drinking water was a problem for example in the Flint, Michigan, water crisis. The researchers in this study collected statistics on various lithium levels in drinking water in 234 counties in the state of Texas. Texas was used for the data on lithium levels because the researchers said it was freely available. Lithium is a water-soluble alkali metal found in mineral springs and igneous rocks. Lithium is … Read more

Fluoride Mouthrinse May reduce Dental Caries in Children and Adolescents

An interesting article titled “Limited evidence suggests fluoride mouthrinse may reduce dental caries in children and adolescents” appears in the April 2017 issue of JADA written by Linda L. Cheng (issue 7, p263–266). The article explores the following question “In children and adolescents, does fluoride mouthrinse prevent dental caries compared with a placebo or no treatment?” The article discusses how reviewers searched 9 databases with no restriction on language or date of publication up through April 22, 2016. At least 2 reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Dental caries were defined as clinical and radiographic lesions recorded at the dentin level of diagnosis. A total of  37 trials involving 15,813 children and adolescents, aged 6-14 years, were included in the results. Nearly all of the trials were conducted in schools on the supervised use of fluoride mouthrinse except … Read more

When Should Children Start Using Fluoride Toothpaste?

There is some conflicting information about when children should start using fluoride toothpaste. Studies have suggested that young children who consume large amounts of fluoride through fluoridated water, beverages, and toothpaste have an increased chance of developing mild enamel fluorosis see http://blog.teethremoval.com/large-amounts-of-fluoride-consumed-by-young-children-leads-to-fluorosis/. Hence some felt that not using any fluoridated toothpaste when a child was young was the better choice, whereas some felt that that using a small amount of fluoride toothpaste was okay In 2014, the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs updated its guidance on the use of fluoride toothpaste for children. The new guidance is that children’s teeth should be brushed with fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first tooth comes in. The idea is to provide children with the full benefit of cavity protection while also minimizing the risk of the development of fluorosis. The ADA’s Council on … Read more

Fluoride in Water Does Not Lower Intelligence

An interesting article titled “Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand,” appears in the 2014 edition of the American Journal of Public Health by Jonathan M. Broadbent and et. al. The researchers set out to explore whether or not having fluoride in water that one drinks when they are young and age effects the developing brain negatively. The researchers followed nearly all aspects of the health and development of around 1,000 people born in Dunedin in southeast New Zealand in 1972-1973, up to age 38. The researchers compared IQs of those who grew up in Dunedin suburbs with and without fluoridated water. Furthermore, if one used fluoride toothpaste and tablets the researchers used this in their analysis. The researchers focused on fluoride expose during the first five years of life as this is a critical period of time … Read more