Tag Archives | gum disease

Periodontal Therapy Impact on General Health

An interesting article titled “Impact of Periodontal Therapy on General Health,” appears in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (published online June 18, 2014) and written by Marjorie Jeffcoat and et. al. The authors attempt to estimate the effects of periodontal therapy on medical costs and hospitalizations among those with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, cerebral vascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and pregnancy. The goal was to see if periodontal disease therapy might prevent or mitigate some of the adverse effects associated with the 5 studied conditions. The authors found significant reductions in healthcare costs and hospital admissions for pregnant women and patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and cerebral vascular disease. The authors found that the medical costs for pregnant women were 74% lower than for those with untreated periodontal disease. Patients with both type 2 diabetes and cerebral vascular disease had medical costs that were roughly 40% lower than for those with untreated periodontal disease. In addition those with coronary artery disease had medical costs that were roughly 11% lower than those with untreated periodontal disease. Periodontal disease can be treated by cleaning the tooth above and below the gum line with scaling and root planning. […]

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Gum Disease Bacteria may Facilitate Rheumatoid Arthritis

As stated over on the risks of keeping wisdom teeth page, gum disease (periodontal disease) has been shown to have associations with many different systemic diseases. One such systemic disease is rheumatoid arthritis (RA). So far, any mechanism has remained elusive. In a recent study appearing in PLoS Pathogens, researchers at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry Oral Health and Systemic Diseases and other researchers from the European Union’s Gums and Joints project have uncovered how the bacteria responsible for periodontal disease known as Porphyromonas gingivalis effects rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers showed that this bacteria leads to faster progression, greater severity and earlier onset of RA and can cause bone and cartilage destruction. The researchers found the bacteria produces a unique enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminanse (PAD), which enhances collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), which is an arthritis produced in the lab designed to mimic RA. PAD changes residues of some proteins into citrulline that the body recognizes as intruders which leads to an immune attack. In RA patients, this leads to chronic inflammation which causes  bone and cartilage destruction in joints. Another oral bacteria known as Prevotella intermedia was also studied by did not produce this response to PAD as Porphyromonas gingivalis […]

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Treating Gum Disease in Australians Leads to Better Vascular Health

According to a new study in the journal of Hypertension, a single session of gum treatment in Aboriginal Australians can lead to a significant decline in the thickening of the wall of the carotid artery a year later. The thickness of the wall of the arteries is a risk factor for heart disease. Aboriginal Australians are generally thought to have poorer oral health and higher rates of cardiovascular disease when compared to other Australian groups. The researchers say that the effect is comparable to a 30% fall in low density lipoprotein cholesterol which is known as bad cholesterol and associated with a decreased risk of heart disease. The researchers also note that such an effect is equivalent to reversing four years of aging or 25 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure. Periodontal or gum disease is an inflammatory disease which affects the soft and hard structures supporting the teeth and leading them to become swollen and red. In more advanced forms of periodontal disease the gum tissue can be destroyed and the gums pull away from the teeth. Even more troubling is that bone can be lost and teeth may fall out. Cardiovascular disease also known as atherosclerosis is the most […]

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Gum diease can lead to selective disarming of the immune system

A new study has shown that bacteria responsible for many cases of periodontitis causes dysbiosis in a two prong manipulation of the immune system. The researchers say that periodontal bacterium porphyromonas gingivalis acts on two molecular pathways to block immune cells’ killing ability while preserving the cells’ ability to cause inflammation. This protects these bacteria from being removed by the immune system and leads to bone loss and inflammation which is characteristic of periodontitis. The researchers say when inflammation occurs breakdown products are produced which causes dysbiosis and creates a vicious cycle. P. gingivalis is known as a keystone pathogen. Their presence may be relatively few in the mouth but they can exert a large pull on the overall microbial ecosystem. P. gingivalis doesn’t actually cause periodontitis but is responsible for causing the process that leads to it. The researchers believe that keystone pathogens like P. gingivalis play a role in other inflammatory disease but this still needs to be researched. In the study the researchers looked at neutrophils, which carry the bulk of responsibility of responding to periodontal problems. They investigated the role of two protein receptors C5aR and Toll-like receptor-2, or TLR2. It was found that mice without either receptors and mice treated […]

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Oral Bacteria That Causes Periodontitis Delievers a One-Two Punch

Oral health care workers and scientists have know for many years that bacteria cause periodontitis (gum disease); however, they were not sure exactly what bacteria was response. Recently the bacteria that causes periodontitis (gum disease) has been identified by a University of Michigan study. This bacterium is known as NI1060. It was also found that this triggers a normally protetive protein in the oral cavity called Nod1 to trigger bone destroying cells. In normal circumstances Nod1 fights harmful bacterium in the body. Hence, it was that the bacteria that causes gum disease triggers a one-two punch by also causing normally protective proteins to then destroy more bone. In normal cases No1 helps to fight infection by recruiting neutrophils which are blood cells that act as bacterial killers. Nod1 also removes harmful bacteria during infection. When periodontitis (gum disease) occurs NI1060 will cause Nod1 to trigger neutrophils and also osteoclasts which are cells that destroy bone. The researchers are encouraged by the results in that they can help to better develop personalized therapy for dental patients. Periodontitis (gum disease) has been discussed on this site before numerous times. In one blog post it is discussed how Gum Disease Is More Common […]

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