Tag Archives | hospital

Should Patients Be Told Of Trainee Role in Their Surgery?

An interesting article titled “Should Patients Be Told of Resident Role in Their Surgery?” appears in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery written by James R. Hupp (2015, vol., 73, pp. 2071-2073). The article discusses how early July is the beginning of a new academic year in most hospital-based medical and dental residency programs. During this time many new doctors obtain clinical education. Hospital based dental residency programs often involved a lot of surgical procedures. The article questions if patients should be told of the residents potential role (and lack of experience) in their own surgery. The saying goes that one should try to avoid going to the emergency room or have surgery the first week of July or even all of July. The common thought is that the large amount of new trainees increases the chances of patient problems. In actuality, most first-year residents are given limited or no surgical responsibilities in the first few months of training. The author states “Most of us would want to know who will be in charge of our procedure and what role residents will play. Should this information always be shared with our patients? This is where informing the patient can enter a gray area.” Of course if one goes to a teaching hospital they may […]

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Proper Dental Care Can Lead to Less Respiratory Infections in the ICU

A study appearing in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology suggests that proper dental care can lead to less respiratory infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital. The study was conducted by Brazilian researchers who used an observer-blind randomized clinical trial to analyze data from 254 patients who stayed in a ICU for at least 48 hours. The patients were randomized to receive enhanced dental care by a dentist or to receive standard oral hygiene by a nurse. Enhanced dental care included teeth brushing, tongue scraping, atraumatic restorative treatment, removal of calculus, extraction of teeth, and topical application of chlorhexidine 4 to 5 times a week. Regular dental care consisted of mechanical cleansing using gauze which was followed by chlorhexidine 3 times a week. The patients who received enchanced dental care were 56% less likely to develop a respiratory tract infection during their ICU stay when compared to the patient control group. The researchers feel that enchanced dental treatment routinely performed in ICUs can help in reducing oral bacteria and help prevent respiratory tract infections like ventilator associated pneumonia. This study shows that bacteria causing infections can often start in the mouth or oral cavity. Source: Wanessa T. Bellissimo-Rodrigues […]

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Exploring the Alternative to Medical Injury Claims in New Hampshire

In a post last year I dicussed briefly the early offer system in New Hampshire see The Optional Alternative to Medical Injury Claims. This is the first of the kind system in the United States that is an alternative to the traditional medical malpractice system. An article in the 2013 issue 4 of the American Journal of Law and Medicine has explored this titled “Evaluating New Hampshire’s First-In-The-Nation Early Offer Alternative to Medical Malpractice Litigation,” and written by John W. Masland. The article states “Many states have enacted medical malpractice reforms, recognizing that their tort systems result in protracted litigation, high costs, and a large number of uncompensated victims. One proposed reform, an “early offer” system, allows a medical provider to make a financial offer covering an injured patient’s economic damages, which, if the patient accepts, precludes litigation…On June 27, 2012, the New Hampshire General Assembly overrode former Governor John Lynch’s veto and established the country’s first early offer payment system for medical malpractice claimants.  After a medical injury, patients may now request an early offer payment from their medical providers for economic damages.” The article goes into more specific details of the early offer program as implemented in New Hampshire. […]

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Pediatric Dental Death in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada Spurs Comments on Dental Anesthesia

Recently, a death has occurred in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada, in a dental office. Details of the case have not yet been released, but a boy died after getting anesthetic and had a previously undetected heart condition. It seemed to have occurred sometime around late April, 2014, but the date may be off a bit. It appears that in this case the boy was brought to a hospital after the dental office in an attempt to save his life. An interesting article over in the Cambridge times published June 27, 2014, by Gordon Paul, titled “Pediatric dental surgery with anesthesia should be done in hospitals, dentist says,” provides some comments on this case. See http://www.cambridgetimes.ca/news-story/4605070-pediatric-dental-surgery-with-anesthesia-should-be-done-in-hospitals-dentist-says/. In this article comments by Dr. Hanover who is on the political action committee of the Ontario Dental Association are provided. He says “I think every pediatric dentist is most comfortable in a hospital. You’ve got the anesthetist, you’ve got a whole team of nurses, you’ve got crash carts, you’ve got ICUs … and in a dental office, you’ve got the dental anesthetist and maybe an RN. That’s the big difference.” Dr. Hanover, says that he has performed dental surgery on thousands of children under general anesthesia, but […]

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Do Physicians Have a Responsibility to Meet the Health Care Needs of Society?

An interesting article appears in the Fall 2012 issue of the The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics by Allan S. Brett titled “Physicians Have a Responsibility to Meet the Health Care Needs of Society.” Allan opens the article by addressing a question that was posed to Ron Paul in the 2012 presidential election by Wolf Blizter which I mentioned before on this post http://blog.teethremoval.com/dumb-americans-trust-their-doctors-for-no-valid-reason/. Allan aruged that Ron Paul agreed with the sentiment that “physicians have a responsibility to meet the health care needs of society.” In the article Allan makes the following case. “In the rest of this essay, I first demonstrate that society is already organized— at least in part — to rescue sick people regardless of ability to pay, and that society is not prepared to abandon that general guiding principle. It follows that physicians — society’s principal instrument for provision of health care services — are expected to meet society’s health care needs. I then argue that the current configuration of the U.S. health care system undermines the ability of physicians to fulfill this mandate effectively. And finally, I argue that the medical profession’s responsibility to meet society’s health care needs also carries a responsibility […]

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