Preventing Lingual Nerve Damage After Wisdom Teeth Extraction

An interesting article titled “Prevention of Lingual Nerve Injury in Third Molar Surgery: Literature Review” written by Pippi et al. appears in the 2017 edition of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol. 75, pp. 890-900). The article discusses attempting to identify any factors that could influence if a patient suffers lingual nerve damage after wisdom teeth removal. In the study the authors reviewed previous literature published up until February 2016 that pertained to lingual nerve injuries after wisdom teeth surgery. From the literature review the authors analyzed three different surgical techniques used for wisdom teeth removal: 1) buccal approach, 2) lingual split technique, and 3) buccal approach plus lingual flap retraction in order to determine if their were any differences on lingual nerve injuries. The authors also evaluated the association between nerve damage and tooth sectioning or ostectomy. … Read more

Wisdom Teeth Surgery Injury Leads to Ride on Rose Parade Float

The Tournament of Roses Parade or Rose Parade for short has been happening every year on New Year’s Day (or sometimes the day after New Year’s Day) since the late 1800s. The Rose Bowl college football game follows the Rose Parade with this year featuring the University of Washington Huskies versus The Ohio State University Buckeyes with Buckeye coach Urban Meyer coaching his final game before retirement. This year a young woman who suffered a nerve injury after having wisdom teeth removed was selected to ride on the 2019 Donate Life Rose Parade float ” Rhythm of the Heart.” The woman had four wisdom teeth removed while she was a sophomore in high school in 2016. Nearly a week after the surgery she was still in pain on her right side due to numbness and infection. Later she learned that her lingual nerve had … Read more

Using Fibrin Glue to Help Lingual Nerve Repair

An interesting article titled “Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report,” was written by Nicholas P. Theberge and Vincent B. Ziccardi and appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 74, pp. 1899 e1-e4). The article describes a report of a case of a woman in her 20s who had an impacted wisdom tooth removed and developed left lingual nerve numbness and pain. She later had surgery with fibrin glue to help correct the lingual nerve injury. The article reports that most lingual nerve injuries after wisdom teeth removal occurs in 0.4% to 22% of cases. Such an injury can be detrimental to patients and lead to drooling, tongue biting, self-induced thermal injuries, and changes in speech, swallowing, and taste perception. Lingual nerve deficit has been reported to … Read more

Exploring the Risk Factors for Injury To Nerves During Wisdom Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Risk Factors for Permanent Injury of Inferior Alveolar and Lingual Nerves During Third Molar Surgery,” appears in The Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 72, issue 12, and written by Edward Nguyen and et al. The article assesses the incidence of and risk factors for permanent neurologic injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or lingual nerve (LN) after wisdom teeth removal. The article states “It has been well documented in the literature that the risk factors for IAN and LN injuries include increasing age, unerupted teeth, deep impaction, distoangular impaction, irregular root morphology, lack of clinician experience, lingual flap and retraction, and radiographic signs of proximity of the third molar to the IAN canal. The main forms of altered sensation that can occur include paraesthesia, anesthesia, or dysesthesia, which may be temporary or permanent. The … Read more

Multi-Million Dollar Award In New York for Wisdom Tooth Extraction

A 49 year old man had issues with a wisdom tooth. He went to several different times and had him attempt to remove it. He was sent home believing the extraction had been performed. However, the dentist had stopped the extraction after learning that the tooth was fused to the bone. Several hours after returning home, the man was rushed to the emergency room and was diagnosed with air emphysema and residuals roots by an oral surgeon. The oral surgeon than extracted the remaining portions of the wisdom tooth. Both the oral surgeon and dentist were found liable for the man’s injuries as neither obtained informed consent for the procedures they performed. The man has been unable to return to work as a hydro-geologist, and remains totally disabled as a result of his constant pain. He suffered extensive oral nerve … Read more