Tag Archives | lingual nerve

Using Fibrin Glue to Help Lingual Nerve Repair

An interesting article titled “Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report,” was written by Nicholas P. Theberge and Vincent B. Ziccardi and appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 74, pp. 1899 e1-e4). The article describes a report of a case of a woman in her 20s who had an impacted wisdom tooth removed and developed left lingual nerve numbness and pain. She later had surgery with fibrin glue to help correct the lingual nerve injury. The article reports that most lingual nerve injuries after wisdom teeth removal occurs in 0.4% to 22% of cases. Such an injury can be detrimental to patients and lead to drooling, tongue biting, self-induced thermal injuries, and changes in speech, swallowing, and taste perception. Lingual nerve deficit has been reported to have the highest incidence in distally impacted lower wisdom teeth, followed by horizontal, mesial, and vertical impactions. When an injury to the lingual nerve occurs full recovery occurs in most patients (58%) within the first 6 months and in 72% patients after 2 years. The article later describes the specific surgery done on the woman. The nerve was freed with […]

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Exploring the Risk Factors for Injury To Nerves During Wisdom Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Risk Factors for Permanent Injury of Inferior Alveolar and Lingual Nerves During Third Molar Surgery,” appears in The Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 72, issue 12, and written by Edward Nguyen and et al. The article assesses the incidence of and risk factors for permanent neurologic injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or lingual nerve (LN) after wisdom teeth removal. The article states “It has been well documented in the literature that the risk factors for IAN and LN injuries include increasing age, unerupted teeth, deep impaction, distoangular impaction, irregular root morphology, lack of clinician experience, lingual flap and retraction, and radiographic signs of proximity of the third molar to the IAN canal. The main forms of altered sensation that can occur include paraesthesia, anesthesia, or dysesthesia, which may be temporary or permanent. The literature reports an incidence of temporary IAN and LN injury ranging from 0.26 to 8.4% and from 0.1 to 22%, respectively, whereas permanent damage ranges from 0.3 to 0.9% for these 2 nerves.” The researchers accessed a database at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne from January 2006 through December 2009, which was part of a Clinical Incident Review process. […]

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Multi-Million Dollar Award In New York for Wisdom Tooth Extraction

A 49 year old man had issues with a wisdom tooth. He went to several different times and had him attempt to remove it. He was sent home believing the extraction had been performed. However, the dentist had stopped the extraction after learning that the tooth was fused to the bone. Several hours after returning home, the man was rushed to the emergency room and was diagnosed with air emphysema and residuals roots by an oral surgeon. The oral surgeon than extracted the remaining portions of the wisdom tooth. Both the oral surgeon and dentist were found liable for the man’s injuries as neither obtained informed consent for the procedures they performed. The man has been unable to return to work as a hydro-geologist, and remains totally disabled as a result of his constant pain. He suffered extensive oral nerve damage, chronic pain, a fractured jaw, memory loss, migraines, permanent loss of taste, fear, anxiety, and depression. The man had subsequent brain surgery (craniotomy) performed to help alleviate his constant-pain. The man was awarded $9.8 million in New York, in October, 2012. See http://www.teethremoval.com/dental_malpractice.html for numerous additional cases of jury awards after wisdom teeth extractions. Sources: http://www.lohud.com/article/20121016/NEWS02/310160082/-9-8-million-settlement-botched-wisdom-tooth-extraction http://www.surgicalrestorative.com/articles/2012/10/jury-awards-huge-settlement-for-a-botched-wisdom-tooth-extraction.html Erik Shilling, […]

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Long Term Effects of Trigeminal Nerve Injuries from Dental Care

A study was published in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery titled “Long-Term Outcome of Trigeminal Nerve Injuries Related to Dental Treatment” by M. Anthony Pogrel, Ryan Jergensen, Eric Burgon, and Daniel Hulme. (vol. 69, pages 2284-2288, 2011) that looked at long-term effects of those who suffer from permanent nerve injury from dental treatment particularly involving the third molars or wisdom teeth. A total of 145 patients with 95 female and 50 male patients were involved in the study who had suffered a trigeminal nerve injury affecting either the inferior alveolar nerve or lingual nerve and in 8 cases both nerves. Nineteen patients (13.1 %) reported that their employment was affected, while 21  patients (14.5%)  reported problems with their relationship, 53  patients (36. 6%) reported depression, 55  patients (38%) reported problems speaking and pronouncing words correctly, 63  patients (43.5%) reported problems eating, and 1 patient reported a significant change in his appearance. Twelve patients (8.2%) were reported to have gone on to make a late full recovery. Some of the coping mechanisms the patients used include getting used to it (64), prayer and mediation (7), ice and heat packs (3), pressure on teeth (3), exercise and yoga (3), antidepressants (2), […]

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