Tag Archives | nerve damage

Using Fibrin Glue to Help Lingual Nerve Repair

An interesting article titled “Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report,” was written by Nicholas P. Theberge and Vincent B. Ziccardi and appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 74, pp. 1899 e1-e4). The article describes a report of a case of a woman in her 20s who had an impacted wisdom tooth removed and developed left lingual nerve numbness and pain. She later had surgery with fibrin glue to help correct the lingual nerve injury. The article reports that most lingual nerve injuries after wisdom teeth removal occurs in 0.4% to 22% of cases. Such an injury can be detrimental to patients and lead to drooling, tongue biting, self-induced thermal injuries, and changes in speech, swallowing, and taste perception. Lingual nerve deficit has been reported to have the highest incidence in distally impacted lower wisdom teeth, followed by horizontal, mesial, and vertical impactions. When an injury to the lingual nerve occurs full recovery occurs in most patients (58%) within the first 6 months and in 72% patients after 2 years. The article later describes the specific surgery done on the woman. The nerve was freed with […]

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Target specific brain cells to help with neuropathic pain

Researchers from Rutgers University have explored treating chronic neuropathic pain which affects over 1 million Americans. Neuropathic pain results when nerve damage is caused due to injury, surgery or a some disease. Researchers showed that pain could be reduced in animals when microglia brain cells are targeted which are supposed to provide immunity. The researchers say that the microglia brain cells are supposed to be beneficial to the nervous system but in those with neuropathic pain these cells known as microglia have proliferated and instead become toxic. The researchers say that if they catch the injury within one to five days to inhibit microglia after nerve injury the development of chronic pain can be partially reversed. Neuropathic pain persists after the nerve has healed and is often resistant to normal pain medications. In lab mice the researchers used chemotherapy drugs to prohibit the microglia brain immune cells from proliferating. This chemotherapy drug reduced the amount of pain the mice experienced after the injury occurred. The researchers feel that minimizing microglial proliferation may be a novel approach for pain control. They hope that this could help lead to the development of more effective pain killers that can help control the pain. As one who suffers from chronic pain […]

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Potential Risks of Surgery for Wisdom Teeth (Third Molars)

M. Anthony Pogrel in his article “What Are the Risks of Operative Intervention?” in the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery vol. 70, pp. 33-36, 2012, suppl. 1, goes into complications associated with removing impacted wisdom teeth (third molars). I have previously explored this topic in detail over at http://www.teethremoval.com/complications.html. Although I did a poor job of distinguishing actual complications from negligence. In the article, Pogrel describes how studies have indicated that around 10% (1 in 10) of people undergoing removal of third molars may suffer from a complication. However, most of these complications are mild and will completely resolve in time. Pogrel states “Complications from M3 removal can be divided into 2 groups: those that are short-lived and self limiting, including bleeding, inflammatory complications such as surgical site infection and alveolar osteitis, or “dry socket,” drug reactions, displaced crowns from adjacent teeth, and short-term anesthetic complications; and those with potential long-term or permanent complications.” Pogrel attempted to find high level evidence and searched PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Database but no randomized controlled trials were found. He attempted to look at case studies used at least 100 patients and did not look at individual case reports and anecdotal reports. […]

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Multi-Million Dollar Award In New York for Wisdom Tooth Extraction

A 49 year old man had issues with a wisdom tooth. He went to several different times and had him attempt to remove it. He was sent home believing the extraction had been performed. However, the dentist had stopped the extraction after learning that the tooth was fused to the bone. Several hours after returning home, the man was rushed to the emergency room and was diagnosed with air emphysema and residuals roots by an oral surgeon. The oral surgeon than extracted the remaining portions of the wisdom tooth. Both the oral surgeon and dentist were found liable for the man’s injuries as neither obtained informed consent for the procedures they performed. The man has been unable to return to work as a hydro-geologist, and remains totally disabled as a result of his constant pain. He suffered extensive oral nerve damage, chronic pain, a fractured jaw, memory loss, migraines, permanent loss of taste, fear, anxiety, and depression. The man had subsequent brain surgery (craniotomy) performed to help alleviate his constant-pain. The man was awarded $9.8 million in New York, in October, 2012. See http://www.teethremoval.com/dental_malpractice.html for numerous additional cases of jury awards after wisdom teeth extractions. Sources: http://www.lohud.com/article/20121016/NEWS02/310160082/-9-8-million-settlement-botched-wisdom-tooth-extraction http://www.surgicalrestorative.com/articles/2012/10/jury-awards-huge-settlement-for-a-botched-wisdom-tooth-extraction.html Erik Shilling, […]

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Avoiding Nerve Injuries with Lower Wisdom Teeth

A study (in press) appears in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (2012) titled “Early extraction: a silver bullet to avoid nerve injury in lower third molar removal?” by Q. B. Zhang and Z. Q. Zhang. At the beginning of the article the authors discuss how lower third molars show the highest incidence of impaction and are responsible for pathology such as pericoronitis, periodontitis, pain, cysts, tumors, and second molar-tooth crown resorption. I have discussed the risks of keeping wisdom teeth in over here http://www.teethremoval.com/risks_of_keeping_wisdom_teeth.html The authors also discuss the complications associated with removal of third molars which I have elaborated on in great detail here http://www.teethremoval.com/complications.html. In this study two groups of patients from China were grouped: A) those less than 23 and with immature teeth, and B) those greater than 23 and with mature teeth. Group A consisted of 518 patients with 808 lower third molars extracted and group B consisted of 532 patients with 810 lower third molars extracted. In Group A 20 of the 808 lower wisdom teeth were associated with complications (2.48%) with all of them temporary. In Group B 81 of the 810 lower wisdom teeth were associated with complications (10%) with […]

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