Wisdom Teeth Surgery Injury Leads to Ride on Rose Parade Float

The Tournament of Roses Parade or Rose Parade for short has been happening every year on New Year’s Day (or sometimes the day after New Year’s Day) since the late 1800s. The Rose Bowl college football game follows the Rose Parade with this year featuring the University of Washington Huskies versus The Ohio State University Buckeyes with Buckeye coach Urban Meyer coaching his final game before retirement. This year a young woman who suffered a nerve injury after having wisdom teeth removed was selected to ride on the 2019 Donate Life Rose Parade float ” Rhythm of the Heart.” The woman had four wisdom teeth removed while she was a sophomore in high school in 2016. Nearly a week after the surgery she was still in pain on her right side due to numbness and infection. Later she learned that her lingual nerve had … Read more

Using Fibrin Glue to Help Lingual Nerve Repair

An interesting article titled “Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report,” was written by Nicholas P. Theberge and Vincent B. Ziccardi and appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 74, pp. 1899 e1-e4). The article describes a report of a case of a woman in her 20s who had an impacted wisdom tooth removed and developed left lingual nerve numbness and pain. She later had surgery with fibrin glue to help correct the lingual nerve injury. The article reports that most lingual nerve injuries after wisdom teeth removal occurs in 0.4% to 22% of cases. Such an injury can be detrimental to patients and lead to drooling, tongue biting, self-induced thermal injuries, and changes in speech, swallowing, and taste perception. Lingual nerve deficit has been reported to … Read more

Trigeminal Nerve Surgery for Neuropathic Pain

An interesting article titled “Factors Determining Outcome After Trigeminal Nerve Surgery for Neuropathic Pain” appears in the July 2016 issue of Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery written by John R. Zuniga and David M. Yates. It is known that the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves which are part of the trigeminal nerves can be damaged after wisdom teeth surgery. Additional surgery can be performed to repair the trigeminal nerve but in some cases this injury remains and is only partially resolved. The others set out to better explore why neuropathic pain can persist after trigeminal nerve surgery. The study included 28 patients who underwent trigeminal nerve repair in Texas between 2006 and 2014. The patients were grouped into three different cohorts: 1) those who had no recurrence (NR) were any neuropathic pain went away, 2) those who had complete recurrence (CR) were the … Read more

Exploring the Risk Factors for Injury To Nerves During Wisdom Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Risk Factors for Permanent Injury of Inferior Alveolar and Lingual Nerves During Third Molar Surgery,” appears in The Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 72, issue 12, and written by Edward Nguyen and et al. The article assesses the incidence of and risk factors for permanent neurologic injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or lingual nerve (LN) after wisdom teeth removal. The article states “It has been well documented in the literature that the risk factors for IAN and LN injuries include increasing age, unerupted teeth, deep impaction, distoangular impaction, irregular root morphology, lack of clinician experience, lingual flap and retraction, and radiographic signs of proximity of the third molar to the IAN canal. The main forms of altered sensation that can occur include paraesthesia, anesthesia, or dysesthesia, which may be temporary or permanent. The … Read more

Using Computed Tomograph (CT) To Lower the Incidence of Wisdom Teeth Removal Nerve Injuries

A question that everyone who has wisdom teeth wants to know these days is the following: “If you use Computed Tomography (CT) can it lower the risk of developing a nerve injury from having wisdom teeth removed?” Three authors from Spain (Sanmarti-Garcia, Valmaseda0-Castellon, Gay-Escoda) recently conducted a study asking this question titled “Does Computed Tomography Prevent Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Caused by Lower Third Molar Removal?” appearing in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (vol 70, pages 5-11, 2012). The issue is as stated by the authors is that “panoramic radiography alone cannot identify the buccolingual position of the mandibular canal and the 3M roots.” Computed tomography (CT) is able to show this information. Even so an estimated 40% of cases show superposition of the roots and the mandibular canal. Hence many of the potential CTs performed may potentially … Read more