Practice Approaches of British Oral Surgeons for Wisdom Teeth Surgery

An interesting article titled “Current practice in mandibular third molar surgery. A national survey of British Association of Oral Surgeons membership,” written by Devine et al. appears in Oral Surgery in 2017 (vol. 10, pp. 11-19). The article discuss the current practices among member of the British Association of Oral Surgeons (BAOS) for wisdom teeth surgery. The authors conducted a survey of members of the British Association of Oral Surgeons from March to June 2015 where 250 of the 520 total members (48.1%) responded. The most common grade of the respondents was specialty dentist (25.2%), primary care oral surgeon (18.4%), associate specialist (18.0%) and oral surgery consultant (13.4%). About 17% of those who responded said that wisdom teeth removal comprises 75% of their workload and about 36% of those who responded said that wisdom teeth removal comprises between 50 and … Read more

Legal Aspects of Sexual Assault During Wisdom Teeth Removal

As has been discussed on this site before, sexual assault can and does happen during wisdom teeth removal. Its a grim reality that happens more frequently than one would think. See for example the posts Teenager Sexually Assaulted by Dental Assistant during Wisdom Teeth Removal, Dentist Who Groped Patients Sentenced to Jail, and Recent Cases of Dentist Assistant Sexual Assault During Wisdom Teeth Removal along with http://www.teethremoval.com/sexual_assault_under_anesthesia_for_wisdom_teeth_removal.html where cases of sexual assault occurring during wisdom teeth surgery are described. When such cases occur, this can cause the victims to want to bring civil cases against the dentist or oral surgeon. There are also criminal charges that can filed by the federal or state government. Thus it is important to understand the differences between civil and criminal law. When a civil dispute occurs between the private rights of individuals, civil litigation … Read more

Reducing Opioids in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

An interesting article titled “Opioid Prescribing Can Be Reduced in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practice,” written by Tatch appears in the 2019 edition of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. In the article the author discusses the results of implementing an office protocol for pain management to reduce opioid use in oral and maxillofacial surgery during a three year time period. Results from a similar study were presented previously in a post titled Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Current Perspectives on Opioid Prescribing. In the article the author discusses how a risk of opioids is dependence which can develop after just one week of using. The author came up with a 3-year retrospective study to measure changes in opioid use after the introduction of an office protocol which was designed to offer alternatives to pain relief. In the study a … Read more

Large Study of Complications after Oral Surgeries

An interesting article titled “Study on post-operative complications after outpatient treatments” written by van der Sleen et al. appears in the 2013 edition of Oral Surgery. The authors were interested in evaluating the post-operative problems or complaints after surgery by oral and maxillofacial surgeons and the frequency of follow up phone calls or visits after the surgery. The authors devised a study to look at all patients who visited Isala Clinics located in the Netherlands in April 2009. All surgeries were performed by six oral and maxillofacial surgeons and two senior residents and done under local anesthesia. All patients received an antiseptic, chlorhexidine 0.12%, to rinse their mouth with 3 times a day for 7 days after surgery. All patients were also given prescriptions for ibuprofen 600 mg to control pain as needed. The surgeries were grouped into four separate … Read more

What is the Better Name: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon or Oral and Facial Surgeon?

An interesting article titled “What Name Best Represents Our Specialty? Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Versus Oral and Facial Surgeon” appears in the 2016 edition of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery written by Guerrero et al. (vol. 75, pp. 9-20). The article addresses if a better name than the current oral and maxillofacial surgeon exists to increase recognition of the profession by the public and other medical doctors. The professional group for oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the U.S. is the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). This group has long been discussed on this site see for example the posts Upcoming Changes to JOMS and AAOMS in 2014 and Advocacy White Paper on Third Molar Surgery by AAOMS. In recent years AAOMS has created a website over at https://myoms.org/ to educate the pubic about the full … Read more