Tag Archives | oral surgery

Comparing Complications from Anesthesia with Wisdom Teeth Extractions

An article titled “Anesthesia Complications of Diazepam Use for Adolescents Receiving Extraction of Third Molars,” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery by Gino Inverso and et. al, vol. 74, pp. 1140-1144. The article seeks to evaluate the safety of midazolam and diazepam for adolescents during wisdom teeth extraction and whether any differences in complications exist when using the 2 benzodiazepines alone or in combination. Compared with diazepam, midazolam has a faster onset of action, greater incidence of amnesia, and shorter recovery time. The authors hypothesized that diazepam, when used as an intravenous sedative agent for third molar extraction, would be associated with a higher rate of anesthetic complication than midazolam. The study included patients enrolled in the OMSOS from January 2001 through December 2010. To be included, patients had to be adolescents (<21 yr old) who underwent at least 1 third molar extraction by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in the ambulatory setting. The study cohort was divided into 3 groups: patients who received diazepam as the only parenteral benzodiazepine, patients who received midazolam as the only parenteral benzodiazepine, and patients who received a combination of diazepam and midazolam. The primary outcome was perioperative anesthetic complications. Complications […]

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Prevalence of Visible Third Molars in the United States Population

An interesting article titled “Prevalence of Visible Third Molars in the United States Population: How Many Individuals Have Third Molars?” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery 74, pp. 13-17, 2016, by Caitlin B. L. Magraw et al. In the article, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is examined to look at the prevalence of wisdom teeth (third molars) in the U.S. population. Cross-sectional analyses of third molar data were conducted by the authors from the NHANES databases of 2001 through 2002, 2009 through 2010, and 2011 through 2012 to compare data for similarity of outcomes on wisdom teeth prevalence in the US population. The authors found the number of visible third molars in the NHANES databases of 2011 through 2012 decreased progressively from a mean of 1.48 in the 20 to 29 year old cohort to 0.81 in the 60 to 69 year old cohort. The authors found that in each NHANES from 2001 through 2012, the number of third molars decreased with each successive age cohort. Even though participants in each successive age cohort differed, there were no reasons for the decrease in numbers of third molars in older cohorts. It is likely […]

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Patient’s Perception of Antibiotic Need After Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Patients’ Perception of the Need for Antibiotics Following Routine Tooth Extraction,” appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Sugery and written by Charles D. Boxx and Daniel M. Laskin (vol. 73, issue 5). The article seeks to perform a study of 120 patients having teeth removed in Richmond, Virginia, at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), to see their perception of antibiotic need. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about whether they expected to be prescribed antibiotics after tooth extraction, whether they would request them if not prescribed and the reason why, and whether they would expect to be prescribed antibiotics for a toothache or a dental abscess. The patients were further asked if they had ever requested antibiotics from a medical doctor for a cold. The patients also indicated their gender, age, and level of education. The study group consisted of 61 women and 59 women with an average age of 48 years. Eighty of the 120 patients expected (66.7%) to receive an antibiotic after tooth removal. There was found to be no statistical difference in the age and education of the positive and negative groups. Seventy percent of […]

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A Study of 185 Coronectomy Procedures of Wisdom Teeth

An interesting article titled “Coronectomy of the Mandibular Third Molar: A Retrospective Study of 185 Procedures and the Decision to Repeat the Coronectomy in Cases of Failure,” appears in the April 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery written by Boaz Frenkel and et. al. (vol. 73, issue 4). The article seeks to evaluate the success rate of coronectomy and if failure occurs, retreatment. Coronectomy is an alternative extraction technique of wisdom teeth to prevent inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in cases of root proximity to the IAN or complicated root anatomy of the mandibular wisdom teeth. The technique seeks to extract the crown of the mandibular wisdom teeth and leave the roots intact. Coronectomy is not without risks and complications and things such as infection, dry socket, and pain can occur in addition to healing that doesn’t fully resolve and root eruption. Coronectomy failure can be treated with reoperation (removal of the residual roots) or in some cases repeat coronectomy can occur. The study included 173 patients undergoing 185 coronectomy procedures between December, 2008, and October,  2012, at Sheba Medical Center in Israel.  Coronectomy was performed when orthopantographic imaging indicated close proximity of the roots of […]

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The Risk of Future Extraction of Wisdom Teeth

An interesting study titled “What is the Risk of Future Extraction of Asymptomatic Third Molars? A Systematic Review,” written by Gary F. Bouloux and et al., appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 73, issue 5). The study attempts to determine the annual and cumulative rate of when asymptomatic wisdom teeth become necessary to remove. The authors state that the management of asymptomatic wisdom teeth is controversial and unresolved. They performed a systematic review of past studies using PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials on retained wisdom teeth. The authors had several criteria necessary for the study to be included in their analysis. The studies were included if they were an English language publication, were a prospective study design, had more than 50 subjects, had recorded the number of subjects or wisdom teeth requiring extraction during the study period, and had a follow-up duration of 1 year or more. Additional criteria were patients aged 18 years old or older, at least 1 wisdom teeth present at enrollment, and only asymptomatic wisdom teeth at enrollment. The authors started with 65 studies and narrowed it down to 7 studies […]

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