Alternatives To Painkillers After Dental Work

It is common for people to have pain after they have dental work. That is why dentists often prescribe opiates. However, opiates can cause dangerous side effects. They can also be addictive. Fortunately, there are many alternatives to opiates. To learn more about opiate addiction, please visit The Recovery Village website. Over-the-Counter Medication  Many people find that over-the-counter pain relievers, such as Tylenol and Advil, can alleviate toothaches. They can also reduce inflammation. If you find that over-the-counter relievers are not working, then your dentist can write you a prescription for a stronger medication.  Apply Ice  Ice is one of the most effective home remedies for alleviating pain after toothaches. Not only can ice alleviate pain but it can also get rid of inflammation. You will need to wrap the ice up in a towel or paper towel before you apply … Read more

Comparing Narcotic Prescribing Habits For Oral Surgeons in the U.S. and Canada

In a previous blog post titled “Do Oral Surgeons Prescribe Too Many Narcotics for use after Wisdom Teeth Removal?” the issue explored was that of whether or not oral surgeons prescribe more than an adequate amount of narcotic pain killers to young adults after wisdom teeth extraction. The article that found around 25% or so of the study respondents prescribe what the authors of the article declared as too many narcotics to control pain which opened the possibility of non-medical use. A new article titled “Comparison of Narcotic Prescribing Habits and Other Methods of Pain Control by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons in the United States and Canada,” sought to explore whether Canadian oral surgeons have similar narcotic prescribing habits. This article was written by Bruce R. Pynn and Daniel M. Laskin and appeared in the December 2014 issue of the … Read more

Do Oral Surgeons Prescribe Too Many Narcotics for use after Wisdom Teeth Removal?

A new article published in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is titled ” Narcotic Prescribing Habits and Other Methods of Pain Control by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons After Impacted Third Molar Removal,” by Ibrahim Mutlu, A. Omar Abubaker, and Daniel M. Laskin (vol. 71, pp. 1500-1503, 2013). The article explores the issue of whether or not oral surgeons regularly prescribe more than an adequate amount of narcotic pain killers to young adults after their wisdom teeth extraction. It has been believed by some that the narcotics given by oral surgeons for wisdom teeth removal can be a source of using narcotics for non-medical uses. In this article a 8 question survey was sent to 100 randomly selected oral and maxillofacial surgeon members of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon (AAOMS). The questions were related to whether … Read more

Placebo Pain Control

New research has come to light to show the “placebo effect” involves evolutionarily old pain control pathways in the human brainstem. Placebo analgesia refers to a person’s relief from pain following being given a chemically inert substance. It is thought to be due to a person’s belief that a potent pain medication was administered. Endogenous opioids are naturally produced by the brain in small amounts and play a key role in the relief of pain and anxiety. Brain imaging studies have shown placebo analgesia stimulates release of endogenous opioids from higher brain regions. “It has been hypothesized that placebo analgesia also recruits the opioidergic descending pain control system, which inhibits pain processing in the spinal cord and, therefore, subsequently reduces pain-related responses in the brain, leading to a decreased pain experience,” says Falk Eippert. Eippert and his colleagues used advanced … Read more