Tag Archives | periodontal disease

Diabetes and dentistry: Two issues which go hand-in-hand

If you happen to hear a conversation about diabetes – you could be forgiven for not realizing it can have a direct impact on your mouth. Numerous studies have shown that there is a direct link between diabetes and your teeth. This correlation was mentioned in an article by a Dorset dentist which led to further exploration. Here, it was outlined how there are two problems which can occur as a result of diabetes. The topic has been investigated in more detail to put together the following guide. This takes a look at both of the problems which were highlighted in the initial article, before embarking on some top tips to make sure you don’t become part of the unlucky group who is affected. Problem #1 – Periodontal disease Few people will have heard of the condition known as periodontal disease, but if you suffer from diabetes you are very much at risk. People who don’t control their diabetes effectively can experience an increase in the glucose concentrates in their blood. In turn, this can cause tissue in the gums (and various other parts of the body for that matter) to inflame. Over time, this inflammation will result in the gum breaking […]

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Monitoring the Periodontal Status of Wisdom Teeth

An interesting article titled “Monitoring for Periodontal Inflammatory Disease in the Third Molar Region,” appears in the April 2015, issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery written by Brent A. Golden and et. al. (vol. 73, issue 4). The study looked at participants who had asymptomatic wisdom teeth and sought to assess the periodontal status of those wisdom teeth at 2 year intervals for 6 years. The participants in the study were taken to have healthy periodontal status of their wisdom teeth if the probing depths were less than 4 mm. A total of 129 such patients were included in the study. In actuality the study participants were a subsample of another larger study were patients had 4 asymptomatic wisdom teeth. The subsample included all participants with a healthy periodontal status (all probing depths less than 4 mm) in the wisdom teeth region, defined as distal of second molars and around adjacent third molars, with clinical data collected at three 2-year intervals. Eighty-nine percent of those in the study visited a dentist at least occasionally, all of them brushed their teeth at least daily, and 67% used dental floss. After 6 years of the study, one-fourth of the […]

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Periodontal Disease Can Lead to More Risk of Kidney Disease

As previously discussed on this website periodontal disease is something one should be aware of when considering whether or not to have wisdom teeth removed as periodontal disease can develop when wisdom teeth are maintained. This is discussed over at http://www.teethremoval.com/risks_of_keeping_wisdom_teeth.html. Many previous studies have looked at periodontal disease and how having it can lead to increased risk for other diseases. See for example http://blog.teethremoval.com/high-level-evidence-to-identify-diseases-and-disorders-associated-with-periodontal-disease/, http://blog.teethremoval.com/periodontal-disease-and-pregnancy-risks/, and http://blog.teethremoval.com/periodontal-disease-may-associate-with-breast-cancer/. In the first post mentioned above it was said “The diseases for which an association with periodontitis has been reported include cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, respiratory disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pancreatic cancer, diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2), preterm delivery, low-birth-weight delivery, preeclampsia, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.” A new study  has now associated periodontitis with an increased risk of kidney disease. The article looked at 699 African American adults who underwent complete dental examinations and decided to look at African Americans as they suffer from periodontal disease more so than other ethnicities. In the study an average follow up of 4.8 years was used for the patients. It was found that there were 21 new cases of chronic kidney disease or 3% new cases. In the study participants with severe periodontal disease had a […]

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Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Risk

In a post many years ago I discussed Patients With Moderate To Severe Periodontitis Need to Be Evaluated For Cardiovascular Problems. In a new study, periodontal disease has again been looked at as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the study conducted, more than 15,000 patients with chronic coronary heart disease gave information on their dental health with results showing periodontal disease indicators were common. The study included self reported dental health information from the STABILITY trial, a clinical trial with 15,828 participants from 39 countries all with chronic coronary heart disease and a risk of cardiovascular disease.  All study participants had a physical exam and blood work up, and completed a lifestyle questionnaire. They reported their remaining number of teeth and frequency of gum bleeding. The results indicated a high prevalence of tooth loss with 16% reporting having no teeth and 41% reporting having less than 15 teeth. Around one-quarter of the patients reported gum bleeding when using a toothbrush. Almost 70% of study participants were current or former smokers. It was shown by statistical analysis that increasing prevalence of tooth loss was significantly associated with higher waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels, and fasting glucose levels. […]

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Periodontal Therapy Impact on General Health

An interesting article titled “Impact of Periodontal Therapy on General Health,” appears in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (published online June 18, 2014) and written by Marjorie Jeffcoat and et. al. The authors attempt to estimate the effects of periodontal therapy on medical costs and hospitalizations among those with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, cerebral vascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and pregnancy. The goal was to see if periodontal disease therapy might prevent or mitigate some of the adverse effects associated with the 5 studied conditions. The authors found significant reductions in healthcare costs and hospital admissions for pregnant women and patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and cerebral vascular disease. The authors found that the medical costs for pregnant women were 74% lower than for those with untreated periodontal disease. Patients with both type 2 diabetes and cerebral vascular disease had medical costs that were roughly 40% lower than for those with untreated periodontal disease. In addition those with coronary artery disease had medical costs that were roughly 11% lower than those with untreated periodontal disease. Periodontal disease can be treated by cleaning the tooth above and below the gum line with scaling and root planning. […]

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