Top Do’s and Dont’s To Follow After Tooth Extraction

Tooth extractions are fairly common, but it’s important to get your teeth extracted the right way and follow certain dos and don’ts after the extraction. The after-care process is very important if you want to prevent infection and bone loss. Below are the top do’s and dont’s from Dr. Chaben who is an experienced Livonia dentist from Platinum Dental Care that you should consider following after tooth extraction. Things to Do After Tooth Extraction Immediately after you return home, apply an ice pack to your jaw on the extraction side to reduce swelling. Change the gauze the dentist has packed into your extraction site at least every half hour to prevent infection. Bite down on the gauze for as long as you can, to help the wound clot and start healing. If you continue bleeding for a few hours after … Read more

Take Me Out! A Brief Guide to Tooth Extraction – Infographic

Extraction is usually the agreed upon option for teeth which have become damaged or decayed where they are no longer reparable. Extraction is also worth considering if your mouth is overcrowded or to reduce the risk of infection if your immune system has been compromised from receiving chemotherapy or an organ transplant. Tooth extraction or tooth removal is generally considered safe and any respectable dentist will be able to put the patient at ease prior to surgery. Patients who are especially apprehensive will be given a sedative to ease their nerves before the dentist administers anesthetic to the area surrounding the tooth that will be extracted. The entire procedure is carried out with great care and intricacy by a dental professional who considers the patient’s health a priority, so you can rest assured that the entire operation will be seamless. Prior to … Read more

Patient’s Perception of Antibiotic Need After Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Patients’ Perception of the Need for Antibiotics Following Routine Tooth Extraction,” appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Sugery and written by Charles D. Boxx and Daniel M. Laskin (vol. 73, issue 5). The article seeks to perform a study of 120 patients having teeth removed in Richmond, Virginia, at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), to see their perception of antibiotic need. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about whether they expected to be prescribed antibiotics after tooth extraction, whether they would request them if not prescribed and the reason why, and whether they would expect to be prescribed antibiotics for a toothache or a dental abscess. The patients were further asked if they had ever requested antibiotics from a medical doctor for a cold. The patients also indicated … Read more

The Risk of Future Extraction of Wisdom Teeth

An interesting study titled “What is the Risk of Future Extraction of Asymptomatic Third Molars? A Systematic Review,” written by Gary F. Bouloux and et al., appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery (vol. 73, issue 5). The study attempts to determine the annual and cumulative rate of when asymptomatic wisdom teeth become necessary to remove. The authors state that the management of asymptomatic wisdom teeth is controversial and unresolved. They performed a systematic review of past studies using PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials on retained wisdom teeth. The authors had several criteria necessary for the study to be included in their analysis. The studies were included if they were an English language publication, were a prospective study design, had more than 50 subjects, had recorded the … Read more

Wisdom Teeth Conspiracy: Electronic Eavesdropping Device

This story may sound a bit bizarre but actually is true. In the 1989 a U.S. Air Force veteran requested copies of his dental treatment records from the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in New Hampshire. He believed he had dental treatment at this facility in 1981 and “….sought his dental records because he believed an electronic eavesdropping device had been planted in his mouth after his wisdom teeth were removed.” Unfortunately at this time the medical records were on paper and the dental records never turned up. So I guess this begs the question of whether or not a listening device can be planted in a tooth extraction socket. I think the technology may be there and it may be possible but I highly doubt this a common occurrence. I suppose this could be possible with a radio-frequency … Read more