Tag Archives | teeth removal

Take Me Out! A Brief Guide to Tooth Extraction – Infographic

Extraction is usually the agreed upon option for teeth which have become damaged or decayed where they are no longer reparable. Extraction is also worth considering if your mouth is overcrowded or to reduce the risk of infection if your immune system has been compromised from receiving chemotherapy or an organ transplant. Tooth extraction or tooth removal is generally considered safe and any respectable dentist will be able to put the patient at ease prior to surgery. Patients who are especially apprehensive will be given a sedative to ease their nerves before the dentist administers anesthetic to the area surrounding the tooth that will be extracted. The entire procedure is carried out with great care and intricacy by a dental professional who considers the patient’s health a priority, so you can rest assured that the entire operation will be seamless. Prior to tooth extraction, it is important to provide your dentist or oral surgeon with your full health history. You must also abstain from eating, drinking and smoking in the hours leading up to the surgery. Also, be sure to have someone to drive you home afterwards, as you will be unable to drive if given certain types of anaesthetics. To find out […]

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Patient’s Perception of Antibiotic Need After Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Patients’ Perception of the Need for Antibiotics Following Routine Tooth Extraction,” appears in the May 2015 issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Sugery and written by Charles D. Boxx and Daniel M. Laskin (vol. 73, issue 5). The article seeks to perform a study of 120 patients having teeth removed in Richmond, Virginia, at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), to see their perception of antibiotic need. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about whether they expected to be prescribed antibiotics after tooth extraction, whether they would request them if not prescribed and the reason why, and whether they would expect to be prescribed antibiotics for a toothache or a dental abscess. The patients were further asked if they had ever requested antibiotics from a medical doctor for a cold. The patients also indicated their gender, age, and level of education. The study group consisted of 61 women and 59 women with an average age of 48 years. Eighty of the 120 patients expected (66.7%) to receive an antibiotic after tooth removal. There was found to be no statistical difference in the age and education of the positive and negative groups. Seventy percent of […]

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Should You Have a Dental Extraction Before a Cardiac Surgery?

An interesting article titled “Morbidity and Mortality Associated With Dental Extraction Before Cardiac Operation,” appears in the March 2014, journal The Annals of Thoracic Surgery (vol. 97, issue 3, pp. 838-844). The article is conducted by researchers from Mayo Clinic. They found that people who had planned dental extraction before cardiac operation are at risk for major adverse outcomes, which included a 3% risk of death before cardiac operation and included an 8% risk of a major adverse outcome including stroke or kidney failure. In many cases problem teeth are extracted before surgery with the thought being that they will reduce the risk of an infection occurring such as endocarditis which is an infection of the inner lining of the heart. Prosthetic heart valve-related endocarditis results in about 25% of infective endocarditis cases and is fatal in up to 38% of patients who develop it. Medical guidelines demonstrate a lack of conclusive evidence for removing disease teeth before surgery as a preventative measure. Researchers set out to determine if removing infected teeth before surgery really is the safer intervention then leaving them in. Patients in this category represent a complex patient group as many of the patients who have dental […]

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Wisdom Teeth Removal: Tweets from Twitter

As the name of this website is teethremoval.com, often discussion of removing teeth, specifically wisdom teeth, are mentioned. One way to find out what people are saying first hand from their wisdom teeth removal experience is from Twitter. Many tweet out some 140 character message with the hashtag #wisdomteeth. Below I have included many tweets with the hashtag #wisdomteeth over the past year in 2014. 1) alexis @kickrockspunk all these ppl at the movie theater eating popcorn and i’m just like slurpee w/ no straw #wisdomteeth 2) paige @paaigehattonn I feel the need to explain to everyone why my cheeks are huge when I’m out #wisdomteeth 3) David Solberg ‏@da_solberg16 Will sell soul to eat solid food #WisdomTeeth 4) weston huser ‏@westonhuser I get to be a chipmunk tomorrow #WisdomTeeth 5) Jenna Haverkamp ‏@JennaHaverkamp Dear Lord, Please don’t let me say or do anything self incriminating in front of my mother while on happy pills today. #wisdomteeth 6) Carley Gassi ‏@cargassi The surgeon told me it didnt actually happen unless i took a selfie after #wisdomteeth 7) Mason Douglas Schaaf ‏@masonschaaf1 Don’t know where I was or who took this picture but these meds got me messed up #wisdomteeth 8) […]

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AAOMS Issues New Position Paper on Medication-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

Earlier in 2014, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons issued a new position paper on Medication related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (MRONJ) see http://www.aaoms.org/docs/position_papers/mronj_position_paper.pdf?pdf=MRONJ-Position-Paper. The condition in the past has been called Bisphosphonate-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw but both antiresorptive and antiangiogenic therapies are associated with it so the name has been updated. MRONJ appears as non-healing exposed bone in the mouth and may affect patients undergoing intravenous cancer-related therapy or those treated with oral or IV bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. The paper states that patients may be considered to have MRONJ if the following characteristics are present: Current or previous treatment with antiresorptive or antiangiogenic agents; Exposed bone or bone that can be probed through an intraoral or extraoral fistula(e) in the maxillofacial region that has persisted for more than eight weeks; No history of radiation therapy to the jaws or obvious metastatic disease to the jaws. Most patients on antiresorptive or antiangiogenic agents who develop MRONJ do so after a dental procedure, such as a tooth extraction. The position paper cites several studies which has shown that between 52% to 61% of patients report tooth extraction as the precipitating event who develop MRONJ. It is estimated that […]

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