Top Do’s and Dont’s To Follow After Tooth Extraction

Tooth extractions are fairly common, but it’s important to get your teeth extracted the right way and follow certain dos and don’ts after the extraction. The after-care process is very important if you want to prevent infection and bone loss. Below are the top do’s and dont’s from Dr. Chaben who is an experienced Livonia dentist from Platinum Dental Care that you should consider following after tooth extraction. Things to Do After Tooth Extraction Immediately after you return home, apply an ice pack to your jaw on the extraction side to reduce swelling. Change the gauze the dentist has packed into your extraction site at least every half hour to prevent infection. Bite down on the gauze for as long as you can, to help the wound clot and start healing. If you continue bleeding for a few hours after … Read more

Is Flossing Really Beneficial?

As the perceived wisdom goes, flossing helps keep your teeth healthy and prevents gum disease. However, studies in recent years have called into question this long-established recommendation, see also http://blog.teethremoval.com/experts-insist-flossing-does-nothing-to-limit-tooth-decaycould-they-be-correct/. So what are the benefits of flossing, if any? Despite the apparent lack of evidence for any health benefits of flossing, both the British and American dental associations still recommend incorporating it into your daily routine. And whilst the evidence to support flossing isn’t there, there isn’t any evidence to show that the activity doesn’t have any benefits. The purpose of using dental floss is to remove food and other residue from between the teeth. It can also help to prevent bloody gums and inflammation from gingivitis, as well as reduce the build-up of plaque on teeth. Reducing all of these factors can help prevent gum disease. So although there … Read more

This Is What Will Happen To Your Teeth If You Give Up Sugar 

When you smile, do you show people that you’re healthy or that you have health problems? If you’re eating too much sugar, you’re damaging your teeth. Your smile will reveal cavities and gum disease, which will dent your confidence and can lead to other health problems. Decreasing how much sugar you eat is important to staying healthy while preserving a beautiful smile. By cutting out sugar, you will boost your oral health, which will have positive effects on the rest of your body. Cutting Out Sugar Prevents Oral Bacteria There are two main types of bacteria that are found in the mouth. These are Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sorbrinus. These bacteria like to eat the sugar you eat, which forms dental plaque on your teeth. This is basically a transparent but sticky coating that forms on the surface of your teeth. … Read more

Bacterium goes from the mouth to the heart to cause disease

The human mouth can have more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist as part of our resident oral microbiota but when they spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic. Researchers from the University of Bristol have revealed a potentially key molecular process that occurs in the case of infective endocarditis, a type of cardiovascular disease in which bacteria cause unwanted blood clots to form on heart valves. If untreated, this condition is fatal and even with treatment, mortality rates are high. There are over 2,000 cases of infective endocarditis in the United Kingdom (UK) annually and the amount is rising. The research involved the use of the UK national synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source. Using this giant X-ray microscope the team was able to visualise the structure and … Read more

Tooth repair could occur using Alzheimer’s drug

The renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp could occur using an Alzheimer’s drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King’s College London. Following trauma or an infection, the inner, soft pulp of a tooth can become exposed and infected. In order to protect the tooth from infection, a thin band of dentine is naturally produced and seals the tooth pulp, but is insufficient to effectively repair large cavities. Currently dentists use human-made cements or fillings, such as calcium and silicon-based products, to treat these larger cavities and fill holes in teeth. This cement remains in the tooth and fails to disintegrate, meaning the normal mineral level of the tooth is never completely restored. In a paper published in Scientific Reports, scientists from King’s College London have proven a way to stimulate stem cells contained in the … Read more