This Is What Will Happen To Your Teeth If You Give Up Sugar 

When you smile, do you show people that you’re healthy or that you have health problems? If you’re eating too much sugar, you’re damaging your teeth. Your smile will reveal cavities and gum disease, which will dent your confidence and can lead to other health problems. Decreasing how much sugar you eat is important to staying healthy while preserving a beautiful smile. By cutting out sugar, you will boost your oral health, which will have positive effects on the rest of your body. Cutting Out Sugar Prevents Oral Bacteria There are two main types of bacteria that are found in the mouth. These are Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sorbrinus. These bacteria like to eat the sugar you eat, which forms dental plaque on your teeth. This is basically a transparent but sticky coating that forms on the surface of your teeth. … Read more

Bacterium goes from the mouth to the heart to cause disease

The human mouth can have more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist as part of our resident oral microbiota but when they spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic. Researchers from the University of Bristol have revealed a potentially key molecular process that occurs in the case of infective endocarditis, a type of cardiovascular disease in which bacteria cause unwanted blood clots to form on heart valves. If untreated, this condition is fatal and even with treatment, mortality rates are high. There are over 2,000 cases of infective endocarditis in the United Kingdom (UK) annually and the amount is rising. The research involved the use of the UK national synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source. Using this giant X-ray microscope the team was able to visualise the structure and … Read more

Tooth repair could occur using Alzheimer’s drug

The renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp could occur using an Alzheimer’s drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King’s College London. Following trauma or an infection, the inner, soft pulp of a tooth can become exposed and infected. In order to protect the tooth from infection, a thin band of dentine is naturally produced and seals the tooth pulp, but is insufficient to effectively repair large cavities. Currently dentists use human-made cements or fillings, such as calcium and silicon-based products, to treat these larger cavities and fill holes in teeth. This cement remains in the tooth and fails to disintegrate, meaning the normal mineral level of the tooth is never completely restored. In a paper published in Scientific Reports, scientists from King’s College London have proven a way to stimulate stem cells contained in the … Read more

Ten Tips to Prevent Tooth Decay

Below is an interesting inforgraphic that talks about ten tips to prevent tooth decay. This includes visiting your dentist regularly, brushing twice a day, brushing your tongue, using fluoride toothpaste, using mouthwash, flossing daily, considering dental sealants, limit snacking, drinking some tap water, and eating tooth-healthy foods. This infographic is from Sydenortho see http://www.sydenortho.com/

The lowdown on pulling teeth (the official way)

It’s an old saying, but if we get into the serious nature of pulling teeth there are some interesting views to read. As you might expect, this isn’t a two-minute procedure. There’s a whole host of information to dissect and whether you go to Limerick dentists or ones at the other side of the country, the advice stays the same. We’ll now take a look at how you should approach pulling teeth and what you need to take into account to make it as painless as possible. Who may require a tooth extraction? While most people are under the assumption that a tooth extraction should only be carried out if you have suffered some damage in your mouth, this isn’t necessarily the case. In truth, the options are endless and we could pen a dissertation mulling over each of them. … Read more