Tag Archives | third molars

Computer Assisted Retrieval of Accidentally Displaced Wisdom Teeth

An article titled “Use of Computer-Assisted Navigation in the Retrieval of Accidentally Displaced Third Molars,” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery, written by Yi Guo and et al., vol. 74, pp. 889-894. The article describes using a computer to retrieve accidentally displaced mandibular third molars. A total of 12 patients in the study successfully had their roots retrieved. They all healed successfully without complications. In rare cases when performing wisdom teeth surgery, a tooth or a tooth root can be displaced. When they are displaced into difficult to access areas surgery retrieving the displaced molars should be performed by conventional methods which include extending the original operative exposure or planning a new operative approach and then finding and removing the tooth. This surgery can cause severe tissue injury or complications. The paper discusses computer-assisted navigation in the retrieval of displaced mandibular third molars and to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. The criterion for using this technique of computer-assisted navigation involved teeth or tooth fragments that were displaced into difficult-to-access areas (sublingual space, pterygomandibular space, lateral pharyngeal space, submandibular space, and lateral cervical space). To localize the displaced mandibular third molar or root fragment computed tomographic […]

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Prevalence of Visible Third Molars in the United States Population

An interesting article titled “Prevalence of Visible Third Molars in the United States Population: How Many Individuals Have Third Molars?” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery 74, pp. 13-17, 2016, by Caitlin B. L. Magraw et al. In the article, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is examined to look at the prevalence of wisdom teeth (third molars) in the U.S. population. Cross-sectional analyses of third molar data were conducted by the authors from the NHANES databases of 2001 through 2002, 2009 through 2010, and 2011 through 2012 to compare data for similarity of outcomes on wisdom teeth prevalence in the US population. The authors found the number of visible third molars in the NHANES databases of 2011 through 2012 decreased progressively from a mean of 1.48 in the 20 to 29 year old cohort to 0.81 in the 60 to 69 year old cohort. The authors found that in each NHANES from 2001 through 2012, the number of third molars decreased with each successive age cohort. Even though participants in each successive age cohort differed, there were no reasons for the decrease in numbers of third molars in older cohorts. It is likely […]

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Successful and Positive Wisdom Teeth Removal Experiences

In the past I posted survey respondent elaborations of their wisdom teeth removal experience that were negative as in the outcome was not what they were expecting. For some of these you can see http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-surgery-survey/ and http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-extraction-survey/ If you have a spare few minutes please complete the wisdom teeth removal survey I have created which is linked to below. http://teethremoval.polldaddy.com/s/6E8CF57E23BD9041 Below are some survey responses of those who have had positive wisdom teeth extractions. All ages given are at the time of surgery. A 23 year old female who had 2 wisdom teeth removed says For me, the worst part was the “laughing gas”. Other than that, I have had no bleeding post-surgery, almost zero swelling, and have not needed to take any pain medication beyond Advil. A 48 year old male who had 4 wisdom teeth removed says after surgery my sinus problems improved. A 31 year old female who had 3 wisdom teeth removed says It went better then I expected, because my wisdom teeth were erputed and it made easier to access them. The oral surgeon didn’t have to cut my gum and bones. Afterwards there were some bleeding I knew that ahead of time. The worst […]

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Wisdom Teeth Promotion and Marketing

I have previously talked about PBHS Inc. on this blog and website. They design many websites for oral surgeons and also help with branding and promotion. I have some issues with them in that they provide websites with nearly identical content for oral surgeons to use http://blog.teethremoval.com/oral-surgeon-websites-similar-content/. Even so they do make quality videos on wisdom teeth although of course fail to disclose many of the more serious complications that can occur and the fact that no evidence thus far supports or refutes removing healthy disease free impacted wisdom teeth. http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-tooth-extraction-video/ On PBHS Inc.’s website, on their third molar education and marketing plan section they say, while of course talking to oral surgeons and dentists “Think about this: One –and only one– extra set of wisdom teeth per week will net you approximately $50,000 more annually. If you do one extra set of wisdom teeth a week for 10 years, your net worth will have increased over $500,000 after taxes (assuming 8.5% interest)! Three or four additional third molar patients every week will significantly impact your net worth.” Clearly oral surgeons and dentists have financial and monetary incentives to extraction wisdom teeth. Unfortunately when patients go to a medical health […]

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Third Molar Multidisciplinary Press Conference

Just a quick update to remind you that the Multidisciplinary Conference on Third Molars (Wisdom Teeth) will be occurring today October 19, 2010, at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel in Washington, D.C. at 11 A.M Eastern. To find out more details please refer to my previous blog post http://blog.teethremoval.com/multidisciplinary-conference-on-third-molars-wisdom-teeth/. If you are unable to make the conference and would like to listen in online, a live audio stream will be provided. Simply visit http://www.visualwebcaster.com/event.asp?id=73177 This conference is being put on by American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) and Ira. D Cheifetz, the immediate past president of AAOMS, will be in attendance. Update: I did get a chance to listen in on the conference which lasted just over an hour. The live stream also showed a PowerPoint presentation to accompany the speakers. The speakers who presented are seen in the above slide on the panel.  If you are interested in learning more about this panel who consisted of Dr. Ira D. Cheifetz, Dr. Louis K. Rafetto, Dr. James Q. Swift, Dr. Raymond P. White, Jr., Dr. Stephen Offenbacher, and Dr. M. Anthony Pogrel you can visit http://www.aaoms.org/docs/media/third_molars/press_conference_biographies.pdf. Each member of the panel did have their own slides which they presented […]

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