Tag Archives | tooth decay

Ten Tips to Prevent Tooth Decay

Below is an interesting inforgraphic that talks about ten tips to prevent tooth decay. This includes visiting your dentist regularly, brushing twice a day, brushing your tongue, using fluoride toothpaste, using mouthwash, flossing daily, considering dental sealants, limit snacking, drinking some tap water, and eating tooth-healthy foods. This infographic is from Sydenortho see http://www.sydenortho.com/

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Nanoparticles can be used to break up plaque and prevent cavities

Bacteria living in dental plaque contribute to tooth decay which is often resistant to traditional antimicrobial treatment. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania took advantage of pH sensitive and enzyme like properties of iron containing nanoparticles to catalyze the activity of hydrogen peroxide. The activated hydrogen peroxide produced free radicals that were able to degrade the biofilm matrix associated with tooth decay and kill bacteria thus preventing plaque and reducing tooth decay. The researchers said that even a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide was effective at disrupting the biofilm. It was found that adding nanoparticles increased the efficiency of bacterial killing more than 5,000-fold. The work built off a seminal finding published in 2007  showing that nanoparticles, long believed to be biologically and chemically inert, could in fact possess enzyme-like properties. This study showed that an iron oxide nanoparticle behaved similarly to a peroxidase, an enzyme found naturally that catalyzes oxidative reactions, often using hydrogen peroxide. Some of the researchers were skeptical to use nanoparticles in an oral setting to kill bacteria because the free radicals can also damage healthy tissue. However the nanoparticles’ activity is dependent on pH and had no catalytic activity at neutral or near-neutral pH of 6.5 or 7, which are […]

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Fluoride in Water Does Not Lower Intelligence

An interesting article titled “Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand,” appears in the 2014 edition of the American Journal of Public Health by Jonathan M. Broadbent and et. al. The researchers set out to explore whether or not having fluoride in water that one drinks when they are young and age effects the developing brain negatively. The researchers followed nearly all aspects of the health and development of around 1,000 people born in Dunedin in southeast New Zealand in 1972-1973, up to age 38. The researchers compared IQs of those who grew up in Dunedin suburbs with and without fluoridated water. Furthermore, if one used fluoride toothpaste and tablets the researchers used this in their analysis. The researchers focused on fluoride expose during the first five years of life as this is a critical period of time in brain development. The researchers looked at average IQ scores between the ages of 7 and 13 years and at age 38, along with subtest scores for working memory, verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, and processing speed. A total of 992 child and 942 adults had data available. The researchers were sure to control for childhood factors which are known to be […]

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Sports and Energy Drinks Can Cause Permanent Tooth Damage

I have previously written about how sports and energy drinks can cause tooth erosion see http://blog.teethremoval.com/energy-drinks-cause-tooth-erosion/. Studies have shown that 30% to 50% of U.S. teens are consuming energy drinks, and up to 62% are consuming at least one sports drink per day. A study published in the May/June 2012 issue of General Dentistry, the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, found that an alarming increase in the consumption of sports and energy drinks, especially among adolescents, is causing irreversible damage to teeth — specifically, the high acidity levels in the drinks erode tooth enamel, the glossy outer layer of the tooth. Poonam Jain, BDS, MS, MPH, lead author of the study says “Young adults consume these drinks assuming that they will improve their sports performance and energy levels and that they are ‘better’ for them than soda. Most of these patients are shocked to learn that these drinks are essentially bathing their teeth with acid.” The researchers found damage to enamel became apparent after five days of exposure to sports or energy drinks, although energy drinks showed a significantly greater potential to damage teeth than sports drinks. The damage that these drinks are causing seems to be irreversible […]

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Coconut Oil May Help with Tooth Decay

Coconut oil may be able to attack the bacteria that causes tooth decay. A team from the Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland tested the antibacterial action of coconut oil in its natural state and coconut oil that had been treated with enzymes. The oils were tested against strains of Streptococcus bacteria which are common inhabitants of the mouth. They found that enzyme-modified coconut oil strongly inhibited the growth of most strains of Streptococcus bacteria including Streptococcus mutans — an acid-producing bacterium that is know to be a major cause of tooth decay. In the future the researchers plan to examine how coconut oil interacts with Streptococcus bacteria at the molecular level and which other strains of harmful bacteria and yeasts it is active against. The team also showed that the enzyme-modified coconut oil was harmful to the yeast Candida albicans which is known to cause thrush. Dr Damien Brady who is leading the research says  “Dental caries is a commonly overlooked health problem affecting 60-90% of children and the majority of adults in industrialized countries. Incorporating enzyme-modified coconut oil into dental hygiene products would be an attractive alternative to chemical additives, particularly as it works at relatively low concentrations. […]

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