Tag Archives | tooth

Does the Sound of the Toothbrush Brushing Effect Quality?

A group  of researchers in Japan have discovered that how effectively we clean our teeth and how satisfied we are with quality of the brushing depends on the sound of the bristles scrubbing against the enamel.  The team used a tiny microphone in a modified toothbrush to ‘sample’ the sound being made in the mouth during brushing and to modulate it and then feed that sound back to a group of volunteers via headphones to see what effect the sound has on cleaning efficacy and satisfaction. The team found that if they manipulated the pitch, or loudness and frequency, of the brushing sound they could change the volunteers’ perception of comfort experienced and accomplishment of brushing. It was also demonstrated that if they gradually increased the frequency as teeth cleaning progressed, the volunteers felt like the process was more comfortable and at the end of brushing that their teeth were cleaner. The researchers feel that it may be possible to motivate users to perform regular brushing to help avoid them in developing cavities. It seems the researchers would like to develop a special toothbrush to manipulate the frequency of tooth brushing sounds. Right now their prototype requires someone to wear headphones. The researches think that […]

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Exploring Mandibular Wisdom Teeth Roots after Coronectomy

Coronectomy involves the removal of part of the mandibular wisdom teeth but retention of the root. It is believed to cause less risk to the inferior alveolar nerve than extraction. An article on this topic titled “Histological evaluation of mandibular third molars roots retrieved after coronectomy,” appears in the 2015 British Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery and written by Vinod Patel and et. al (vol. 52, pp. 415-419). In the article the authors sought to find out the pulpal and periradicular status of retained roots of mandibular wisdom teeth and histologically evaluated coronectomy roots that were removed because of persistent symptoms. It is possible the roots had become infected. A total of 21 patients (with 26 roots) were included in their study with persistent symptoms after the roots had been retrieved. Of the 26 symptomatic roots, radiographic assessments showed coronectomy had been sufficient in twenty, but a shard of enamel had been retained on the root fragment in six. All roots were retrieved with no complications except for 1 which had persistent dsyfunction of the nerve. In their discussion the authors sate “This report is seminal as it shows that all the roots retrieved had a vital vascularised pulp, and in all cases the […]

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Blueberry extract could help treat periodontitis

In an article by Amel Ben Lagha and et al titled “Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifoliumAit.) Polyphenols TargetFusobacterium nucleatumand the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases,” a discussion is made that blueberry extract could be used for treating gum disease (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2015; 63 (31)). Gum disease occurs when bacteria form biofilms or plaques on teeth and the gums become inflamed. In ore severe cases this condition is called periodontitis and requires antibiotic use. By potentially using blueberry extract instead of antibiotics periodontitis could be treated. When gum disease occurs the gums get red and swollen an can bleed easily. If the condition is not treated periodontitis can occur. In order to treat periodontitis dentists scrape off tartar and use antiobitics. Researchers have been exploring other natural ways to treat gum disease. As such, researchers have found that blueberry polyphenols which work against foodborne pathogens, can aiding in fighting Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is a main species of bacteria associated with periodontitis. In their lab work, the researchers tested extracts from the wild lowbush blueberry,Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., against Fusobacterium nucleatum.  It was determined that the polyphenol-rich extracts successfully inhibited the growth of Fusobacterium nucleatum. It also lead to the […]

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People with Missing Teeth May Have Increased Cardiovascular Events

New research has suggested that tooth loss can indicate if a person will have future cardiovascular events, diabetes, and death. The study was conducted at the University of Helsinki in Finland and in collaboration with the National Institute for Health and Welfare. The study used National FINRISK 1997 study data which is a Finnish population-based survey of 8,446 subjects, ages 25 to 75, who filled a comprehensive questionnaire, and participated in clinical examinations. In the study the number of missing teeth was recorded at a baseline and future information regarding health was recorded at a 13 year follow up. It was found that having more than five missing teeth increased the risk for coronary heart disease events and myocardial infarctions by as much as 140 %. If one had more more than nine missing teeth they had an increased risk for diabetes by 31%, cardiovascular diseases by 51%,and death by 37%. The researchers accounted for standard risk factors in their statistical analysis. Disease such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes are a common cause of death throughout the world. They have been found to associate with inflammatory oral diseases such as periodontitis which is a chronic inflammatory disease in the gum tissues. The […]

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Modern Britons Have More Gum Disease than Roman Britons

A study of skulls at the Natural History Museum by King’s College London has shown that the Roman British population from 200 to 400 AD appears to have had less gum disease than we have today. Gum disease is also known as periodontitis and has been covered before numerous times on this blog. The researchers examined 303 skulls from a Roman-British burial ground in Dorset for evidence of dental disease. Around 5% of the skulls showed signs of moderate to severe gum disease compared to today’s population which shows around 15 to 30% of adults have gum disease. Many of the Roman-British skulls showed signs of infections and abscesses and around half had caries (cavities). In addition the skulls showed extensive tooth wear from a young age likely due to their diet. The researchers say that Roman-British population did not smoke and likely had low levels of diabetes which are two factors known to increase gum disease. The peak age of death of this population was around 40 and infections diseases were likely a common contributor. The researchers found the results surprising as modern humans use toothbrushes and see dentists where as the Roman British populations did not. More studies […]

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