Tag Archives | tooth

Modern Britons Have More Gum Disease than Roman Britons

A study of skulls at the Natural History Museum by King’s College London has shown that the Roman British population from 200 to 400 AD appears to have had less gum disease than we have today. Gum disease is also known as periodontitis and has been covered before numerous times on this blog. The researchers examined 303 skulls from a Roman-British burial ground in Dorset for evidence of dental disease. Around 5% of the skulls showed signs of moderate to severe gum disease compared to today’s population which shows around 15 to 30% of adults have gum disease. Many of the Roman-British skulls showed signs of infections and abscesses and around half had caries (cavities). In addition the skulls showed extensive tooth wear from a young age likely due to their diet. The researchers say that Roman-British population did not smoke and likely had low levels of diabetes which are two factors known to increase gum disease. The peak age of death of this population was around 40 and infections diseases were likely a common contributor. The researchers found the results surprising as modern humans use toothbrushes and see dentists where as the Roman British populations did not. More studies […]

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People With Missing Teeth May Not Need Dentures

Interesting research from the University of Adelaide questions whether or not all of those people who have dentures really need them. The research was conducted by the University’s Australian Research Center for Population Oral Health in the School of Dentistry and found that people with tooth loss do not have their quality of life interfered with if they still have a certain type and number of teeth left. These patients are considered to have shortened dental arches which enables them to maintain functional use of many teeth. The researchers says there is a cut off point at which tooth loss contributes to loss of quality of life where dentures can be used to improve dentures. However, the researchers feel that dentures are only needed once that cutting off point is reached. The study was based on data of 2,700 Australians. The researchers say it is about getting the right balance of biting and cutting teeth at the front of the mouth while still having enough of the chewing teeth at the back. Even though people naturally have 28 adult teeth, one can have significantly less teeth and still be able to function properly. The researchers feel the findings have important […]

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The Benefits of CAD/CAM Technology in Dentistry

This is a sponsored post designed to get you excited about CAD/CAM technology in dentistry. In today’s world, CAD/CAM technology has made it very easy for dental patients. CAD stands for Computer aided designing and CAM stands for computer aided manufacturing. The technology has been implemented recently into dental laboratories and made it smooth and simple for dentists to treat their patients within the shortest period of time. In this way, CAD/CAM Technology has gained a lot of popularity. This technology is utilized the best due to the less amount of time used for the procedures. The prosthesis can be designed and developed on the same day itself. A digital impression is taken by the dentist after correcting the particular teeth. The picture is created in the computer and then accordingly the manufacturing unit receives the information in the form of the image. This leads to the formation of the replacement structure. Various other minute descriptions are easily implemented into the prosthesis. The ceramic or composite material are used in order to mill the prosthesis with this technology. The best part is that this technology can be used even in the chair-side. Therefore, the dentist can treat the patient as […]

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Depression Drugs (SSRIs) Linked to Dental Implant Failure

The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) drugs are known to be the most widely used for depression. In a new study by the International and American Associations for Dental Research it has shown that SSRIs can reduce bone formation and lead to an increased risk of bone fracture. The study looked specifically at osseointegration implants and the risk of failures. The study was conducted on patients with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients were explored with 94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs. The specific data analysis used generalized estimation equations models and Kaplain-Meier analysis. After 3 to 67 months of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 were successful in those without SSRIs and 10 dental implants failed an 84 were successful in SSRI users. When compared with those who did not use SSRIs, those who did use SSRIs had an increased risk of dental implant failure (HR=2.31 P <0.01). The failure rates for dental implants were 4.6% for those who did not use SSRIs and 10.6% for those who did use SSRIs. In addition, the study showed that smoking habits, small implant diameters (<=4mm), and bone augmentation […]

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Heart Infections on the Rise in Dental Patients After Antibiotic Reductions

In March 2008, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence issued guidelines recommending that dentists should no longer give antibiotics before invasive treatments to people who are considered at risk of developing a life threatening heart infection. The life threatening heart infection is known as infective endocarditis and 40% of all cases are caused by bacteria in the mouth. Researchers at the University of Sheffield set out to explore the impact of these guidelines. It was found that an increase in cases of infective endocarditis was observed above what was expected. In March 2013, this increase accounted for an extra 35 cases of infective endocarditis per month. The researchers found that the number of  prescribed antibiotic prophylaxis fell by 89% from 10,900 prescriptions per month, before the 2008 NICE guidelines, to 1,235 a month by March 2008. The researchers understand that infective endocarditis is a rare infection and want the guideline committees to re-evaluate the benefits and risks of giving antibiotic prophylaxis. It is important to understand that maintaining high standards of oral hygiene can lead to reducing the number of bacteria in the mouth and reducing the number of invasive dental procedures that need to be performed. The […]

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