Tag Archives | trigeminal nerve

More effective treatment of nerve pain

It is known after wisdom teeth removal that it is possible to develop lasting nerve pain. In some cases this nerve pain could be that of trigeminal neuralgia which is characterized by sharp, lancinating pain in the teeth or facial area. The standard treatment for this chronic nerve pain can cause burdening side effects. A new study has demonstrated a novel substance that can help inhibit this type of nerve pain. Trigeminal neuralgia can cause sharp pain that shoots to the face or teeth and torments those suffering. The bouts are triggered by touch, such as shaving, putting on make-up, showering, talking and tooth brushing, or even a gust of wind. The cause is usually from an irritation of the trigeminal nerve, the cranial nerve responsible for the sensory innervation of the facial area, parts of the scalp, and the oral cavity. Pain signals are known to reach the brain via the activation of sodium channels located in the membranes of nerve cells. The sodium channel “1.7” is frequently expressed on pain-conducting nerves and higher pain intensity is linked to higher channel activity. Blocking this sodium channel inhibits pain. In trigeminal neuralgia, the nerve damage is presumed to be at […]

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Trigeminal Nerve Surgery for Neuropathic Pain

An interesting article titled “Factors Determining Outcome After Trigeminal Nerve Surgery for Neuropathic Pain” appears in the July 2016 issue of Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery written by John R. Zuniga and David M. Yates. It is known that the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves which are part of the trigeminal nerves can be damaged after wisdom teeth surgery. Additional surgery can be performed to repair the trigeminal nerve but in some cases this injury remains and is only partially resolved. The others set out to better explore why neuropathic pain can persist after trigeminal nerve surgery. The study included 28 patients who underwent trigeminal nerve repair in Texas between 2006 and 2014. The patients were grouped into three different cohorts: 1) those who had no recurrence (NR) were any neuropathic pain went away, 2) those who had complete recurrence (CR) were the pain level of any neuropathic pain was the same postoperatively, and 3) those who had incomplete recurrence (ICR) were the pain intensity was below the pain intensity prior to surgery.  Seven patients were in the NR cohort (25%), ten were in the CR cohort (36%), and eleven were in the ICR cohort (39%). There were statistically significant differences found among groups at 3 months, […]

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Cluster Headache Features and Therapeutic Options

A review article titled “Cluster Headache: Clinical Features and Therapeutic Options” written by Charly Gaul, Hans-Christoph Diener, and Oliver M. Muller published in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (vol. 108, issue 33, pages 543-549, 2011) provides an interesting look on new options for those with a chronic refractory cluster headache. The article discusses how 120,000 people in Germany are affected by cluster headache. The attacks are in the periorbital area on one side and last 90 minutes on average. The attacks often posses a circadian and seasonal rhythm. The author lists the diagnostic criteria for cluster headache as from the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II). First line drugs for treatment include verapamil and cortisione or lithium and topirmate. In addition, short term relief can be obtained by local anesthetics and steroids along the course of the greater occipital nerve. I have taken verapamil as discussed over at http://www.teethremoval.com/ndph.html and also had lidocaine injected into my occipital nerve as discussed over at http://www.teethremoval.com/occipital_nerve_block.html as treatment strategies after suffering from a 24/7 headache 2 days after having all 4 healthy wisdom teeth removed. I did not have a positive experience with the occipital nerve block which just led to more lasting pain and […]

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Long Term Effects of Trigeminal Nerve Injuries from Dental Care

A study was published in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery titled “Long-Term Outcome of Trigeminal Nerve Injuries Related to Dental Treatment” by M. Anthony Pogrel, Ryan Jergensen, Eric Burgon, and Daniel Hulme. (vol. 69, pages 2284-2288, 2011) that looked at long-term effects of those who suffer from permanent nerve injury from dental treatment particularly involving the third molars or wisdom teeth. A total of 145 patients with 95 female and 50 male patients were involved in the study who had suffered a trigeminal nerve injury affecting either the inferior alveolar nerve or lingual nerve and in 8 cases both nerves. Nineteen patients (13.1 %) reported that their employment was affected, while 21  patients (14.5%)  reported problems with their relationship, 53  patients (36. 6%) reported depression, 55  patients (38%) reported problems speaking and pronouncing words correctly, 63  patients (43.5%) reported problems eating, and 1 patient reported a significant change in his appearance. Twelve patients (8.2%) were reported to have gone on to make a late full recovery. Some of the coping mechanisms the patients used include getting used to it (64), prayer and mediation (7), ice and heat packs (3), pressure on teeth (3), exercise and yoga (3), antidepressants (2), […]

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