Tag Archives | wisdom teeth complications

Pneumomediastinum After Coronectomy

An interesting article titled “Surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum after coronectomy” appears in the 2015 British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and written by C. Wong and et al. (vol. 53, pp. 763-764). The article describes a case of emphysema and pneumomediastinum occuring in an otherwise healthy 48 year old women after coronectomy of a lower wisdom tooth. This was determined by a chest x-ray after she presented with swelling and impaired eye opening. No surgery was necessary and after staying in the hospital several hours she was discharged. Around a week later the swelling had resolved. The authors say they do not know of any other cases of pneumomediastinum occuring after coronectomy; however, it is known to occur after wisdom teeth removal. See http://www.teethremoval.com/complications.html where a discussion of this occurs. It appears that an air turbine drill was used in this women’s case and introduced air into the mediastinum through the parapharyngealand retropharyngeal spaces. The authors state “Although pneumomediastinum usually resolves spontaneously in 3 to 10 days, potential complications include mediastinitis, cardiac tamponade, obstruction of the airway, simple or tension pneumothorax, and pneumoperitoneum.” The women appears to have recovered without any problems. In the article a picture of the women is provided shortly after coronectomy and then again 1 week after […]

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Is Not Removing Wisdom Teeth Causing Harm?

An interesting article titled “Is official advice about NOT pulling out wisdom teeth doing more harm than good?” appeared earlier this year in February 2015, on the DailyMail over at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2946498/Is-NHS-causing-agony-telling-dentists-not-pull-wisdom-teeth.html and written by Cara Lee. The article questions whether or not the year 2000 guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) went too far with preventing wisdom teeth extractions in teenagers and young adults. In these guidelines NICE said that the practice of prophylactic removal of pathology-free impacted third molars should be discontinued in the National Health Service in the U.K. Hence only wisdom teeth with problems should be extracted. In the article on the DailyMail there is a discussion of a 31 year old male who never had wisdom teeth extracted in his teens. Now he needs his wisdom teeth extracted and the molars next to his wisdom teeth possibly extracted due to decay and cavities. There is also a discussion of a 24 year old female who never had her wisdom teeth extracted in her teens. Now she has been experiencing intense intermittent pain in her lower jaw. Sometimes she had difficulty eating and the pain woke her up from sleeping. This will […]

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Seventeen Year Old Minnesota Teen Dies After Wisdom Teeth Extraction

A few weeks ago in June, 2015, a 17 year old Minnesota woman died about a week after having wisdom teeth surgery. Near the end of the wisdom teeth surgery her blood pressure increased, her pulse dropped, and she went into cardiac arrest. She then was transferred to a hospital and suffered from seizures and swelling in her brain until passing about a week later. It is not clear what caused the death to occur. She could have possibly had an undisclosed heart condition that has occurred in other cases. It is possible for a patient to only become aware of an asymptomatic and abnormal heart rhythm once they come in for a surgery. I have discussed other deaths from wisdom teeth removal on this website (see http://www.teethremoval.com/death.html). Based on numerous studies and publications I have said that around 1 death occurs in every 400,000 from wisdom teeth surgery (see http://www.teethremoval.com/mortality_rates_in_dentistry.html). For some additional cases where a teenager died after wisdom teeth surgery in the United States of America see for example http://blog.teethremoval.com/flesh-eating-bacteria-leads-to-death-after-wisdom-teeth-removal/ and http://blog.teethremoval.com/wisdom-teeth-removal-leaves-to-death-two-days-after/. Source: Elizabeth Narins. 17-Year-Old Girl Dies After Getting Her Wisdom Teeth Removed. June 16, 2015. http://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/news/a41983/17-year-old-girl-dies-after-getting-her-wisdom-teeth-removed/. Accessed July 4, 2015.

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A Study of Outcomes Related to Wisdom Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “A Prospective Study of Clinical Outcomes Related to Third Molar Removal or Retention,” appears in the American Journal of Public Health (April 2014, Vol 104, No. 4) written by Greg J. Huang and et al. The article is a companion article to another also on wisdom teeth in the April 2014 issue of the journal. I discussed the companion article last week in the blog post http://blog.teethremoval.com/practice-based-wisdom-teeth-removal-study/. The article opens by mentioning the controversy surrounding the removal of wisdom teeth. On one side some have advocated for wisdom teeth to be removed to prevent future pathology and minimize risks, others have advocated for wisdom teeth to be removed to prevent lower incisor crowding, and others have argued for wisdom teeth to be removed to prevent periodontal pathology. On the other side some have advocated for wisdom teeth to be retained to avoid complications that can result, with some being lasting and permanent. This study set out to better explore long term outcomes of retaining or removing wisdom teeth by following up with patients over a period of two years. The methods used for the subjects in the study were the same as in the previous companion […]

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Practice Based Wisdom Teeth Removal Study

An interesting article titled “Recommendations for Third Molar Removal: A Practice-Based Cohort Study,” appears in the April 2014, issue of the American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 104, No. 4, pp. 728-734), by Joana Cunha-Cruz and et. al. In the article a dental practice based research network Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) is used. A total of 50 general dentists enrolled patients from May 2009 to September 2010.  In the study a total of 797 patients who had wisdom teeth (third molar) recommendations from their general dentist were used who were aged 16 to 22. However, the patients were asked to take a survey every 8 months and then a clinical visit 24 months later.  From this sample of 797 patients only 516 completed at least one follow up questionnaire. In the study the general dentists reported that their philosophy for wisdom teeth management fell into 3 categories: 1) in most cases, for preventive reasons (22%), 2) if they were asymptomatic but had poor eruption path or insufficient space (72%), 3) only if pathology or symptoms were present (6%). A total of 1683 wisdom teeth were recommended for extraction from 469 patients. The main reasons for recommending wisdom […]

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