Tag Archives | Wisdom Teeth

Ten Year Anniversary of Teethremoval.com

This month in August 2017 marks a milestone for Teethremoval.com. It has now been 10 years since the site was first developed and content started to populate. Here is a look back at some of my favorite posts over the past ten years: In Light of the Allegations of Child Sex Abuse at Penn State… Updates on Anesthesia Provided by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Third Molar Multidisciplinary Press Conference How to Improve Your Chances to Win a Dental Malpractice Lawsuit When Abstinence is Evidence-Based What to Do about the Fourth Molar: Similar Management Strategies as the Third Molar aka Wisdom Tooth? I hope you have learned something from reading the content related to wisdom teeth, dental care, headaches, and healthcare in general over the past 10 years.

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More effective treatment of nerve pain

It is known after wisdom teeth removal that it is possible to develop lasting nerve pain. In some cases this nerve pain could be that of trigeminal neuralgia which is characterized by sharp, lancinating pain in the teeth or facial area. The standard treatment for this chronic nerve pain can cause burdening side effects. A new study has demonstrated a novel substance that can help inhibit this type of nerve pain. Trigeminal neuralgia can cause sharp pain that shoots to the face or teeth and torments those suffering. The bouts are triggered by touch, such as shaving, putting on make-up, showering, talking and tooth brushing, or even a gust of wind. The cause is usually from an irritation of the trigeminal nerve, the cranial nerve responsible for the sensory innervation of the facial area, parts of the scalp, and the oral cavity. Pain signals are known to reach the brain via the activation of sodium channels located in the membranes of nerve cells. The sodium channel “1.7” is frequently expressed on pain-conducting nerves and higher pain intensity is linked to higher channel activity. Blocking this sodium channel inhibits pain. In trigeminal neuralgia, the nerve damage is presumed to be at […]

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Tips to Afford Quality Dental Care

I was recently alerted to a post on thesimpledollar.com talking about how to afford quality dental care. The link for this post is at http://www.thesimpledollar.com/how-to-afford-quality-dental-care/. The article is written by Chris Sirico and was last updated on June 15, 2017. The article goes into some of the costs for common dental procedures and what you can do if you don’t have insurance. The article also goes into HSAs/FSAs, dental credit cards, dental financing, dental savings plans, dental insurance, and cosmetic dentistry. The article provides a very nice chart about the average cost for various dental procedures with and without insurance. For example the average cost of removing a single wisdom tooth is $416 without insurance and has an average cost of $250 to $750 if you have insurance. As another example the average cost of a surgical tooth extraction is $401 without insurance and has an average cost of $334 with insurance. The article says that if you don’t have dental insurance or have a limited budget then you can talk to the dental office staff to see if there is anything they can do to help. Dental financing or a dental savings plan may be able to help. With dental […]

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The Effect of a Single Dose of Antibiotics Prior to Wisdom Teeth Surgery

An interesting article titled “A Systematic Review on Effect of Single-Dose Preoperative Antibiotics at Surgical Osteotomy Extraction of Lower Third Molars” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxilofacial Surgery and written by Karoline Brørup Marcussen and et. al. (vol. 74, pp. 693-703). The authors sought to conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness of a single dose of preoperative antibiotics for preventing infection and alveolar osteitis [dry socket] in lower wisdom tooth surgery performed with osteotomy. Using antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative complications in surgical removal of impacted lower wisdom teeth is controversial. All randomized controlled trials  (RCTs) evaluating the effect of all types of prophylactic antibiotics administered 20 to 120 minutes preoperatively versus no antibiotics or placebo on the incidence of infection after surgical removal of lower impacted wisdom up to 1 week after surgery, were reviewed by the authors. In the search, 196 search hits were found. From these, 50 potentially relevant reports and 9 relevant reviews were identified. From these 7 RCTs were included and 3 additional were turned up in other searchers. Three RCTs reported infections, 4 RCTs reported alveolar osteitis, and 3 RCTs reported both infections and alveolar osteitis as outcomes. Finally a total of  1,390 patients from 10 RCTs were included. The meta-analysis showed that the use of antibiotics significantly reduced […]

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Comparing Ibuprofen and Etodolac on Swelling and Pain After Wisdom Teeth Removal

An interesting article titled “Comparative Assessment of the Effect of Ibuprofen and Etodolac on Edema, Trismus, and Pain in Lower Third Molar Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial” appears in the 2016 Journal of Oral an Maxilofacial Surgery written by Julio Cesar Silva de Oliveira and et al. (vol. 74, pp. 1524-1530). The authors set out to explore if ibuprofen or etodolac is more effective in managing pain, swelling, and trismus after wisdom teeth removal. After wisdom teeth removal symptoms such as swelling, pain and limited mouth opening (trismus) can present. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for the rapid relief of moderate pain in inflammatory conditions and soft tissue trauma. The mechanism of action of NSAIDs is the inhibition of the release of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme that is responsible for the production of prostaglandins (PGs). Ibuprofen is an NSAID which inhibits COX-1 and COX-2. Etodolac differs from other NSAIDs by being more selective to the inducible COX-2. Specifically the authors set out to peform a double-blind, randomized, paired crossover study to compare the antiinflammatory effects of ibuprofen, 600 mg, with those of etodolac, 300 mg, both used with dexamethasone, 4 mg, given preoperatively, on pain, edema, and mouth-opening limitation. A total of 20 patients were included treated at Aracatuba Dental School in Brazil. For the first treatment, 1 hour before […]

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